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Old July 6, 2008, 05:09 AM
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Default ...liquid metal instead of water!

Can I replace the water with liquid metal like Gallium? ...keeping the water pump and rad...

Thank you
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Old July 6, 2008, 05:24 AM
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I don't know what the viscosity of liquid metal is, but I'm going to assume it's a lot more dense than a standard liquid. With that in mind, I'd guess that standard water cooling pumps wouldn't last too long under those workloads.
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Old July 6, 2008, 05:32 AM
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" gallium is a brittle solid at low temperatures but liquefies slightly above room temperature and will melt in the hand "
"Gallium metal expands by 3.1 percent when it solidifies, and therefore storage in either glass or metal containers is avoided, due to the possibility of container rupture with freezing."

Gallium - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

techPowerUp! News :: NanoCoolers puts liquid metal in your PC
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Old July 6, 2008, 05:38 AM
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doesn't sound like a good idea;
Gallium - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

its solid at room temp, and the whole attacking other metals thing.....
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Old July 6, 2008, 05:51 AM
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This article mention that it is better to use a magnetic pump but I was just wondering if someone had try it.
...Some new video card will have liquid metal cooling system...

http://www.qats.com/qpedia/Qpedia_06...ng_Systems.pdf
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Old July 6, 2008, 08:59 AM
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It has been done by several companies.It has been dropped by several companies.

While it does seem like a good idea , The materials don't exist to make it safe.

The gallium-indium alloy that is used , is the most effective metal solvent on earth.What this means , is that every single metal part exposed to it , is gonna go away sooner or later.Like the block , or the rad , etc.If you think a water leak in a computer is bad ....

The last company I heard of got out of the Gallium-indium loops because of the insanely high failure rate of the components , and since it was designed for high end servers , I'm sure they ended up replacing a few of those too.....

You might actually be able to find one on ebay.I've seen em in there.

Until such materials that are a) not metal and b)conduct heat are used , it'll stay a curiosity.

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Old July 6, 2008, 06:44 PM
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@ Brain--this look familiar?

"BrainEater
12-18-2006, 06:26 PM

The metal used is not pure gallium.

It's an alloy called 'Galinstan' . It is 68.5 % Gallium , 21.5 % Indium and 10% tin.It melts at ~ -19c.

The company that made these units , Nanocoolers (Thin Film Thermoelectric - Thermal Management: NanoCoolers.com) does not build them anymore.Now , I've heard two reasons for this : patent disputes and or technical issues.I cannot speak to the patent stuff , but I do know the technical bits.

Galinstan , like nearly every liquid metal , is a really good solvent for,well,metals.If you think you've seen corrosion in a waterblock , you havnt seen anything.Galinstan will dissolve aluminum like it's not there.Copper , forget it.Galinstan is such an agressive metal it will even attack Platinum.....And this of course ruins the properties of the galinstan.

This makes blocks and rads rather difficult at best....certain refractory metals (Refractory metals - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) may be capable of resisting galinstan , but i'd hate to think what a Tungsten or Molybdenum block/rad would cost.

This also makes the em pumps ( the MHD pump) have a limited lifetime , for the same reason , the electrodes dissolve.

:cool"
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Old July 7, 2008, 04:58 AM
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Beside all the disadvantages that have been listed, you won't get better performance since the water is the best heat transporter of the earth.
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Old July 7, 2008, 05:22 AM
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heh,,,unklmo

That'd be my post over at [h]forums about the very same subject.
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Old July 7, 2008, 05:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leclerc View Post
Beside all the disadvantages that have been listed, you won't get better performance since the water is the best heat transporter of the earth.
Not entirely true.

While water has a very high specific heat capacity , liquid metals have a much higher thermal conductivity and a much larger thermal flux capability.

Performance of a liquid cooling system cannot be graded on the liquid alone.

I suggest The heat transfer wiki would be a good primer.

------

On an interesting side note :

There are 2 liquid cooling methods for nuclear reactors : water , and liquid metals.So it can and is used in certain circumstances.

Once again , if you think a water leak can be bad : Monju fast breeder reactor leak

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