Go Back   Hardware Canucks > CASES & COOLING > Water Cooling

    
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old July 4, 2008, 12:05 PM
Top Prospect
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 144
Default WaterCooling Component Guide

This thread has a purpose: To assist newcomers in watercooling to become more knowledgeable about their components. Please use this guide appropriately. If any fixes are needed just enlighten me!
All these components can be bought from Canada. The cheapest prices to all these components can be found on this link right here: Canadian Prices: Search. Compare. Buy. - Canadian Online Shopping Search and Comparison!

CPU WaterBlocks

1. Heatkiller 3.0

2. Swiftech Apogee GTZ

3. EK Supreme

4. Aqua Computer Cuplex XT Double Impact 2 (DI 2)


GPU Blocks

You're probably thinking, "Why the heck is this section empty?". Well regular GPU blocks are in my opinion, obsolete. At the rate nVidia and AMD/ATi are rolling out GPUs, these blocks never keep up with fitting support. That's why I suggest that you buy some full-coverage blocks.

Full-Coverage GPU Blocks

Well for this section you cannot really rank these blocks. But I can provide you more information about these type of blocks. Essentially these blocks are just a giant slab of metal(copper, nickel, acetal) that are put on to your graphics card. I would also like to mention that FC Blocks cool the GPU Core, the memory, and the voltage regulators, etc. In other words, everything on the card. This makes it very easy for you to water cool the graphics card. The brands that are very popular for FC blocks amongst watercoolers would have to be EK, Heatkiller, Danger Den, and Aqua Computers. The manufacturers often can keep up with building the blocks to match modern GPUs, that's why I recommend full-coverage blocks. These kinds of blocks are more expensive though and cannot be used for any other card, except for the card it was created for.

Radiators

1. Swiftech MCR Series (120/220/320/Stackable 220/Stackable 320)
A favorite radiator series among watercoolers. Swiftech's MCR series has unbeatable value. It combinesawesome performance with an excellent price tag. The Swiftech's also come in the "stackable" variation, which allows you to sandwich two of these. This radiator isn't very restrictive, though it isn't the most free flowing. Though there are some minor cons. This radiator does have awesome performance, but isn't the performance king. I also wish that this radiator was just a little bit more free-flowing.

2. Thermochill PA Series (120/240/360/420/480)
The famous Thermochills that everybody speaks of. These radiators are special, because they have odd fan spacing. With slower fans these radiators perform the best and take the performance crown. And because these specialize in slower speed fans, this radiator can be very silent. It's also very free-flowing, actually the most free-flowing of the bunch. But because of the odd fan spacing, mounting this radiator to an ordinary case can be very grueling. Though there are some cases that specialize in Thermochill fittings. Also these radiators are extremely pricey. The second most pricey of the radiators here.

3. Black Ice GT Xtreme Series (120/140/240/280/360/420/480/560)
This radiator from HardWare Labs has a wide selection of sizes. From 120mm to 480mm. With higher speed fans these radiators can easily seize the performance king. But after all it is the most restrictive radiator here. These radiators are also pretty pricey, not as much as the Thermochills but still pricey. Lastly, with high speed fans, the radiator can get loud. Not the radiator itself, but the fans.

4. Feser-One X-Changer Series (120/240/360/420/480)
Feser-One has recently joined the watercooling business. Most of their products have worked very well. These radiators are no exception. These look to be like a Thermochill clone. Feser-One radiators specialize in low-speed fans just like Thermochills do. Some tests have shown that these are a little bit worse than Thermochills. However Feser-One is creating a 480mm radiator. I am positive that the 480mm will beat the Thermochills.


5. Feser-One X-Changer Monsta Extreme (360 & 420) (Meaning 3X120mm or 3X140mm)

Pumps

1. Laing DDC 3.25



2. Swiftech MCP655/Laing D5
The MCP655 is often the most popular pump amongst watercoolers. This pump is also a very powerful pump, silent, and fairly affordable considering pumps with higher prices. However there are a couple of setbacks. This pump is not the most powerful on the list, and also this pump is medium-sized. But overall this pump is usually enough for the average set-up.

3. Swiftech MCP355/Laing DDC 3.2
This pump is a pump with quite a bit of power, more than a MCP655. However the stock top is not all that powerful. I would advise that you buy an aftermarket top. Such as the Petra's Top, a very popular aftermarket block made of acetal. With a good aftermarket top, this pump shines. It settles in second place in terms of power.



Tubing

1. Primochill Primoflex LRT
This tubing has the best bending radius here. Very flexible. Primoflex comes in several colours, including blue, green, red, black, just to name a few. I particularly like this tubing because of it's value. You get 10 feet, compared to the usual 5 feet. The cheapest I've seen it go is $13.

2. Feser-One Tubing
Feser-One is the new kid on the block. I expected this tubing to deliver. And it does. Sure, it doesn't flex as much as the Primoflex, but it's flexes better than Tygon. That means alot right there. This comes in the same colours as the Primoflex, except it doesn't come in black, but it comes in silver. Another reason that Feser-One is not nearly is as good is because that it only gives 5 feet. But at the same time it's slightly more expensive.

3. MasterKleer PVC 7/16" Tubing
For a perfect seal for components, this is the tubing for you. I still advise you use hose clamps and zip ties though. This tubing is very affordable, but it doesn't bend as well as the tubing here. It only bends better than the Swiftech tubing. 7/16" is believed to be the "sweet spot" for tubing, but if you can get a tight seal for 1/2". 1/2" is still king.

4. Tygon R-3603
A few months ago, every watercooler liked Tygon R-3603. But then along came Feser-One and Primoflex. Many people still use Tygon, but they don't realize that Primoflex and Feser-One make better tubing. Though this tubing still bends very well. It's also very transparent, so you can see what's inside the tubing. Still, Tygon is very expensive tubing and in conclusion, not worth it.

Future Products

None! I hope I will be able to update this section frequently, as I will be juggling school as well.

Last edited by freakgeek1337; September 7, 2009 at 11:33 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old July 4, 2008, 01:56 PM
CanadaRox's Avatar
Allstar
F@H
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Scarborough (Toronto)
Posts: 614
Default

This will be a great addition to the forum if we can keep it up to date and thorough. If you want any help I'll be glad to throw in my 0.02.
__________________
Project: Black and White
i7 920 D0 | 3 x 2GB DDR3 | EVGA X58 SLI LE
XFX 4890 | Corsair HX750 | Corsair Obsidian
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old July 4, 2008, 02:48 PM
Cptn Vortex's Avatar
Hall Of Fame
F@H
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 3,755
Default

Yay! I'll be sure to throw in some feedback....
__________________
The Vortex H20

Coolermaster ATCS 840 w Window panel
MSI Z77A-GD65
Intel i7 3770K @ 4.6GHZ 1.28v
Galaxy GTX 680 @ 1241MHZ
8GB Mushkin Blackline 1600MHZ 9-9-9-24 1.5v
Asus Xonar Essence STX
OCZ Z-Series GOLD 850W
2 x 128GB Corsair Force GT SATA3 SSD RAID0 :)
Acheiva Shimian Q270 Lite 2560x1440

Benq W500 Pojector.

Watercooling:
EK Supreme HF, EK FC GTX 680 Block, MCR320+Gelid Silent 12 Push/Pull, DD Pump, EK Multioption 100ml Res, EK Coolstream XT 220 RAD Gelid Wings Push/Pull.
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old July 4, 2008, 06:34 PM
Hall Of Fame
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Calgary, AB
Posts: 3,344
Default

I will wait for this guide of yours, seen few of them at other forums but not quite as helpful really.
I think if sswilson and Cpt Vortex also add some info it will be helpful since those 2 are basically in almost all threads in here commenting and helping.
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old July 4, 2008, 08:05 PM
Top Prospect
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 144
Default Reply

Thanks for the support guys, I REALLY appreciate it. Thanks once again.
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old July 4, 2008, 08:16 PM
matsta31's Avatar
Hall Of Fame
F@H
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Montreal
Posts: 2,204
Default

I support this, really specially the canadian side of it. You should really take a look at this one, this is up to date and detailed about what is currently the ''good'' parts :

Water Cooling Parts Guide 2008 V1.2 - EXTREME Overclocking Forums
__________________

Sold hardware again.....
Currently using WHS hardware....
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old July 5, 2008, 05:59 AM
Mibs's Avatar
MVP
F@H
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: St. John's, NL
Posts: 311
Default

Good work freakgeek! The guide from the above post is great too, but it's good to have our own!
__________________
Intel C2D E6750 @ 3.52 GHz // EVGA 680i SLI Rev. A1 (P31) // 4 GB OCZ Platinum 800 MHz 4-4-4-15 // PC P&C Silencer 750 Quad // Antec P180 // EVGA 8800 GTS 512 // Samsung Syncmaster 226bw 22" LCD

WC Loop: D-Tek Fuzion V2 // Danger Den Maze 5 // Swiftech MCP655 // Swiftech MicroRes // Thermochill PA 120.2 + 4 x Noctua NF-P12
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old July 5, 2008, 11:17 AM
CanadaRox's Avatar
Allstar
F@H
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Scarborough (Toronto)
Posts: 614
Default

You should also mention that the D-Tek V2 can use nozzles and has an optional quad midplate, and that it is also fairly restrictive. And it would be worth adding something for full coverage GPU blocks (not any specific one, just all of them in general). Great work so far though
__________________
Project: Black and White
i7 920 D0 | 3 x 2GB DDR3 | EVGA X58 SLI LE
XFX 4890 | Corsair HX750 | Corsair Obsidian
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old July 5, 2008, 11:37 AM
Top Prospect
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 144
Default Reply

K will do. Thanks for the feedback! Keep it coming.
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old July 5, 2008, 12:57 PM
Supergrover's Avatar
Hall Of Fame
F@H
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Okanagan Falls, British Columbia
Posts: 4,261

My System Specs

Default

How about getting the price added to the items?

Since most newcomers to water wont necessarily know this info.

And I second the full coverage block section.

You should mention that bowing the GT nets you a few more C's.
__________________
R.I.P.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 3.0charlie View Post
My knuckles are bleeding from fishing through walls a new CAT6 network cable... I found fresh, untapped electrical outlets...
"It's all in the Reflexes"-Jack Burton
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes