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Old November 7, 2013, 01:09 AM
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Default How Dead Is My System?

So around last Saturday or so I came home from a LAN party and booted up my system which has a full custom WC loop in it and began to play games. After about an hour or so my wife thought it'd be a good idea to go ahead and move my computer from the floor back to on top of my desk while I was disposed since that's where I usually keep it to avoid myself or my family from placing a liquid on my desk and spilling on said computer. She apparently thought it would be a good idea to attempt this without actually unplugging it and since it was installing updates (or so I'm told not totally sure what she was thinking to be honest). At any rate, she didn't realize quite how heavy it was with the liquid in it and dropped it. I heard the crash and shortly hear her scream. Apparently liquid had begun to burst from my CPU block. She says that the computer lost power within a few seconds of this occurring. I've heard mixed things regarding whether or not the computer components are toast. I generally assume that since the liquid was quite literally everywhere (all over my MOBO, RAM, GTX 670, PSU) the computer components are probably dead. If they aren't from that then more than likely when the FESER One I use hit the PSU I assume it probably surged everything and that probably killed everything anyway.

I guess what I'm wondering is really what are the chances my system will have survived this? I do use FESER One non-conductive fluid which I know is not really THAT non-conductive. I've read that if I clean everything up effectively there's a slim chance it might still be okay but I was kinda hoping to get some other opinions on the matter. I assume that since I couldn't really clean the PSU I should just assume it is dead. Oh, and when I came out to clean up the mess before I unplugged the computer the green light on my MOBO that signifies it currently has power was lit up so I'm not sure if that helps either in regards to making this judgement.

Just really don't want to waste my time if there's no chance in hell the machine will have survived this.
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Old November 7, 2013, 03:36 AM
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depends if try to start while it was wet. let it dry out for a week with no power to system, remove CMOS battery, cards, cpu and place Motherboard on rad heater or in direct sun light

lucky may be only psu failed
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Old November 7, 2013, 03:42 AM
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Depending on how hard of a shock from the drop, the motherboard could be damaged from the g forces which may cause the system to shut off.

Since you used basically a distilled water with dye (and their anti corosive additive) which would be non conductive as long as it did not become contaminated with anything foreign matter in the tubing that could be conductive (we don't know if there was anything else used before Feser) which is a low probability and a worst case senario.

Your system may not be dead at all after allowing it to dry, or at least remove water droplets with canned air or air compressor.

However I would be more concerned about how badly it was dropped. That's where things could have been damaged or components need to be replaced.
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Old November 7, 2013, 06:46 AM
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Let everything dry out for at least 5 days. After that try to start the system up on the least amount of hardware needed to get it running i.e. 1 stick of ram, single video card, 1 HDD/SDD and so on. This minimizes the issues that could happen at first start up when trying to figure out if anything was damaged in the drop. Hopefully none of the parts shorted when the water leaked on the system. Electronic and computer boards are cleaned with water at the factories anyways. Good Luck.
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Old November 7, 2013, 08:34 AM
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I would totally disassemble your rig to clean and inspect all your components. My wife dropped a rig once and the heatsink/CPU came out of the socket. Luckily there was no permanent damage.
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Old November 7, 2013, 10:14 AM
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I'd disassemble everything and let it dry up for a few days at least, then power them all back on. The most obvious sign of damage would have been a shorted, burning smell. But with non-conductive fluid, it really should be okay. I'd probably be more concerned with HDDs though.
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Old November 7, 2013, 11:05 AM
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I would pull everything and then I am not sure if it would work or not but try the rice trick to absorb any moister. and when I say pull everything I mean everything including the CPU
I would think that if anything was going to break it would be the motherboard from the weight of the water blocks being jarred I all.so thing it depended on how the pc droped like did it drop flat on its side and is it a tower if it was a to and it dropped on its side you might get lucky.
I almost had something similar happen to me with my rather water cooled gigabyte 3d arura case I picked up up from the floor without thinking moved the wrong way case slipped out of my hands but I was able to quickly use my knees to wedge the case against something that was right next to it which banged pretty hard but also slowed it down long enough for me to quickly grab it again. muy system didn't start and had a bunch of beeps and suck butI just pulled the ram and cpu and my water cooled vidcard reseated everything and it fired right up
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Old November 7, 2013, 11:10 AM
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Pretty much all fluids are conductive once they ionize, which they will. So his coolant definitely wouldn't prevent a short circuit. Baalieal will just need to pull the entire system apart and let it dry. You can also aid in drying w/ a blow dryer.
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Old November 7, 2013, 12:47 PM
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did you give hell to your wife??? Or was it more * ahhh dang.. dont worry honey its nothing...*??? I have had water on my old pc but once all was dry then it worked except for my gpu.
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Old November 7, 2013, 03:30 PM
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So far I've verified that the PSU still works despite everything (at least it can power my LEDs from my Razer blocks). I actually used my wifes computer to hotswap my HDD and SSD and make sure they still work. They do luckily. I've allowed it to dry for around 5 days. Pulled everything out and cleaned it shortly after the spill. Reassembled the GPU with it's water blocks. Removed the CPU to ensure that there is no fluid residue in the socket and managed to get thermal compound in the socket. I assume I should by some iso and clean that up before replacing the CPU. I assume I can't just put the GPU in my wifes computer and power it up to see if it works without running fluid? Would the backplate and block be enough to cool for a few seconds to ensure that the card actually works?


And as far as giving my wife hell goes I told her worst case scenario we are going to submit a claim to my renters insurance who already verified that they would honor the claim since I have accidental drop and spill protection on our electronics and that her christmas present this year would be my deductible :p
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