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-   -   Thermal Capacity of Radiators (http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/water-cooling/58160-thermal-capacity-radiators.html)

concinnity November 27, 2012 05:37 PM

Thermal Capacity of Radiators
 
Wondering if there is a rule for the thermal capacity of radiators. What are the benefits/drawbacks to higher or lower FPIs? Does a slim radiator with a high FPI have a similar thermal capacity to a thick one with a low FPI?

Keltron 3030 November 27, 2012 08:26 PM

A general rule is that you get a 120 per component you are running in the loop. For example, in my loop, I am cooling my CPU and GPU, so a 240 rad is the minimum to get (I am actually using a 360 rad in the loop).

With FPI, the more the better, however with more FPI, you need higher performing fans to push air through the tight space. Rads with lower FPI can be used with low speed fans.

And in terms of thermal capacity, each rad is different, but the thermal capacity of it also depends on what fans you have pushing air over it. If you have a slim rad w/ high FPI with slow fans on it, your loop will run really hot, as the fans cannot push enough air through the rad quick enough.

Hopefully this helps a bit.

concinnity November 28, 2012 12:09 PM

Thanks

dustin1706 November 28, 2012 05:01 PM

Just like keltron says it depends on your goals. And a 120 per component is a good rule for minimum rad requirements.

A higher FPI rad has more surface area, but is more restrictive so it requires more air movement meaning faster, generally louder fans. However, it has more cooling potential if you can give it enough air. A low FPI rad has less surface area but can be adequately cooled by very slow, quiet fans.

Also bear in mind that some rads are thicker than others. A thicker rad will have more surface area compared to a thinner one with identical FPI.

Skinnee labs has some good objective radiator reviews and comparisons. Radiators | Skinnee Labs

concinnity November 29, 2012 06:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Keltron 3030 (Post 673893)
For example, in my loop, I am cooling my CPU and GPU, so a 240 rad is the minimum to get (I am actually using a 360 rad in the loop).

I was going to do a loop with a 3770K and an OC'ed 670- Considerably cooler running than a 2500k and a 580. What thickness was your 360 rad? I was planning on using a UT60 from XSPC.

Keltron 3030 November 29, 2012 09:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by concinnity (Post 674197)
I was going to do a loop with a 3770K and an OC'ed 670- Considerably cooler running than a 2500k and a 580. What thickness was your 360 rad? I was planning on using a UT60 from XSPC.

I'm currently using this: Slim Triple 120mm Radiator XSPC RS360

Keeps my temps in check real well, and I don't need high-speed fans with it.

concinnity November 29, 2012 12:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Keltron 3030 (Post 674230)
I'm currently using this: Slim Triple 120mm Radiator XSPC RS360

Keeps my temps in check real well, and I don't need high-speed fans with it.

Sounds good

Thanks for the help


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