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-   -   Hoping you could help on some water cooling (http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/water-cooling/49543-hoping-you-could-help-some-water-cooling.html)

Shaz1993 December 18, 2011 05:14 PM

Hoping you could help on some water cooling
 
I am hoping to build a new system with the latest LGA 2011 processors and two GTX 570's to start with, and 16gb of ram in 8gb dimms and i want to water cool the entire system, uncluding the motherboard.

this would mean a block for the CPU, two for graphics card, One From RAM modules, and then for the chipset and power regualtors. At first i was thinking of running one loops with the rad's at different points, then i thought of splitting it into too loops but using one powerfull pump, but now i am thinking two pumps, but i will only have limited space in the case.

What sort of basic outline would you suggest for such a setup? And what size rads do you think would be ideal?

enaberif December 18, 2011 07:01 PM

no gain for the board or ram.

gpu and cpu yes.

waste of money for the board and ram

zsamz_ December 18, 2011 08:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by enaberif (Post 581225)
no gain for the board or ram.

gpu and cpu yes.

waste of money for the board and ram


exactly

waste of $$

supaflyx3 December 18, 2011 08:48 PM

If you don't plan on upgrading your ram in the future, go for 4GB DIMMs. You'd be able to get 32GB of ram in 4GB DIMMs for around the price of 16GB of 8GB DIMMs.

matari December 19, 2011 07:15 AM

Currently, 16 GB ram is standard for X79 chipset. With the current price of ram, there is little reason not purchase 16 GB of ram.

As far as H2O goes, there is little need to liquid cool RAM modules. The X79 chipset almost requires a fan on it at all times. Liquid cooling specific parts of the board will not change that fact. Your better off using the money for chipset blocks on upgrading your motherboard to one that has decent heatsinks.

clshades December 19, 2011 11:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by enaberif (Post 581225)
no gain for the board or ram.

gpu and cpu yes.

waste of money for the board and ram

That is incorrect sir.

Listen you guys that denounce ram cooling. Having done this in the past for overclocking high frequency ram I can tell you for certain that I achieved higher more stable OC's water cooling the ram. Currently the 1600MHz ram I'm using is running at 32C with a fan cooler on full. With the fan turned off they get pretty hot as I bought the low profile stuff to make sure i can always sell this stuff down the road. If I could afford to WC my ram I would in a heartbeat.

If you plan on running high frequency ram and getting the highest over all OC water cooling the ram is FULLY worth the effort. Keep in mind you aren't getting much airflow when you don't use a HSF so the ram temps get hot and stagnant.

Just sayin...

matari December 19, 2011 12:19 PM

Please give me the data that points toward liquid cooling RAM being beneficial typical enthusiast application. Besides who wants to risk damaging their module by removing the heat spreader. Second, the amount of restriction added by full coverage blocks almost requires a separate loop.

there are only a few reasons to liquid cool your ram. One, lower your case ambient, and for looks.

enaberif December 19, 2011 12:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clshades (Post 581419)
That is incorrect sir.

Listen you guys that denounce ram cooling. Having done this in the past for overclocking high frequency ram I can tell you for certain that I achieved higher more stable OC's water cooling the ram. Currently the 1600MHz ram I'm using is running at 32C with a fan cooler on full. With the fan turned off they get pretty hot as I bought the low profile stuff to make sure i can always sell this stuff down the road. If I could afford to WC my ram I would in a heartbeat.

If you plan on running high frequency ram and getting the highest over all OC water cooling the ram is FULLY worth the effort. Keep in mind you aren't getting much airflow when you don't use a HSF so the ram temps get hot and stagnant.

Just sayin...

Cons of cooling ram outweigh pros

clshades December 20, 2011 01:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by matari (Post 581436)
Please give me the data that points toward liquid cooling RAM being beneficial typical enthusiast application. Besides who wants to risk damaging their module by removing the heat spreader. Second, the amount of restriction added by full coverage blocks almost requires a separate loop.

there are only a few reasons to liquid cool your ram. One, lower your case ambient, and for looks.

Ram is cheap. Take your time. It's not a race.

I can't GIVE you any real data other than this that I found after some searching. I didn't record or care to record much information mainly beacuse of people like you who claim it does nothing other than look good etc. Water cooling is a hobby for me and rather than having huge debates with people who have NEVER EVEN TRIED IT I just kept to myself and played. Generally speaking if someone says it doesn't do anything significant I'll normally just find out for myself. Why not? That's why they call it a hobby. Having brought this topic up in the past it resulted in a bunch of people freaking out and bias'd opinions based on very limited reviews on the net (at least the ones I read)

When I ran it I did a dual loop to start and then tried a single loop manifold setup after. I ran both setups for over a year combined and about 6 months with no water cooling on the ram. A single 120mm rad was all I needed for the ram with a small xspc all-in-one pump. Dual loop worked the best and most half decent cases these days support a 360 and 120 rad internally.

Dual loop worked better. Higher over all OC and more stable ram compared to NOT water cooling it at the same frequencies. In fact in most cases trying to run the same OC's without water cooling the ram resulted in BSOD's until I dropped the ram frequencies which in turn allowed me to drop the voltages and run the ram cooler. Under water it wasn't an issue with the higher frequencies especially after a session of gaming.

Easiest and fastest way to test this theory I discovered was overclocking strictly with FSB as it's the hardest way to OC as you have to adjust for your memory all the way through. It's certainly more challenging than just upping the multi.

Anyway... I don't wanna steal the OP's thunder here suffice to say that I'll always support water cooling ram based on my own experiences and seeing real results 1st hand for an extended period of time. :thumb:

supaflyx3 December 20, 2011 03:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by enaberif (Post 581438)
Cons of cooling ram outweigh pros

This, and unless overclocking changed from SB to SB-E you won't even need to overclock your ram.


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