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Old December 31, 2012, 08:26 PM
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Default replacing raid drive how to question

i have my os on an ssd and to 500g drives in raid0 for everything else. im really unsure on how to replace the raid drives. one is failing and i figure with the sales on everything, i bought 2 new 500g drives to replace. question is how? never done it before and i prefer to not lose anything on the raid drives.

someone point me in the proper place, it would be great.
thanks and happy new year
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Old January 1, 2013, 10:36 AM
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If they are in Raid 0, and a drive is failing you had best copy everything you want to save off that array immediately. RAID 0 is not really RAID (ie redundant) and any drive failure is non-recoverable and will lose all data in the array.

If you want to continue using such an array, connect the two new drives, create a new RAID 0 array and copy the contents of the old array to the new one. You can then disconnect/repurpose/etc the drives from the original array.

My recommendation would have been to pick up two 1TB drives and put them in RAID 1 for storage space. I never recommend RAID 0 for anything. The slight speed increase is not enough to compensate for the increased risk of data loss and downtime should a drive fail.

Of course RAID is not a substitute for backups regardless of RAID level.
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Old January 2, 2013, 09:06 AM
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Yes. This. Then for additional backups build/buy a NAS and setup a backup schedule to that. Then get somekind of online backup in case the NAS dies as well. Though I can't complain too much. I got two SSDs in RAID0 but that array gets backed up almost daily.
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Old January 2, 2013, 06:34 PM
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I'm not a raid person and will likely never be, but I'm still curious.

what do you mean by 'connect'? Are you referring to internal SATA connections? If so, what if your motherboard has 6 SATA ports (lets just say there's no raid card) and they're all being used for a raid 0 array? do you have to externally connect a drive, copy the raid data over, remove the old drives, plug in 6 new drives, initialize the array, and copy the data from the external to the new array? if so, seems like a pain in the ass to get enough external drives to hold an entire raid array.

also, do all raided drives have to be on the same controller chip? as in, you can't split your drives between the asmedia sata ports and the intel chipset ports.
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Old January 2, 2013, 06:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Generic User #2 View Post
I'm not a raid person and will likely never be, but I'm still curious.

what do you mean by 'connect'? Are you referring to internal SATA connections? If so, what if your motherboard has 6 SATA ports (lets just say there's no raid card) and they're all being used for a raid 0 array? do you have to externally connect a drive, copy the raid data over, remove the old drives, plug in 6 new drives, initialize the array, and copy the data from the external to the new array? if so, seems like a pain in the ass to get enough external drives to hold an entire raid array.

also, do all raided drives have to be on the same controller chip? as in, you can't split your drives between the asmedia sata ports and the intel chipset ports.
Bingo!

The big issue with RAID 0 is that it spans your data across EVERY drive used. Where RAID 1 mirrors it across the drives and in the event a drive fails or has issues you can just swap the single drive.
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Old January 2, 2013, 10:10 PM
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RAID 0 doesn't provide fault tolerance, loose a part of the raid the whole raid fails and can't recover data unlike RAID 1. Best to follow NyteOwl's advice transfer/back up as much data as you can to another drive because when that flaky drive fails it will be bye bye time for your data and use RAID 1 for your next set up. Good luck!
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Old January 4, 2013, 07:22 PM
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thanks for the warnings. i know all that. i know if it hits the fan, ill lose everything. dont care. if it goes, it goes. only thing on the raid setup are game saves and stuff.

back to my original question. how do i go about transferring from the raid setup to 2 new drives.
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Old January 4, 2013, 08:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spudmatic View Post
never done it before and i prefer to not lose anything on the raid drives.
Quote:
Originally Posted by spudmatic View Post
ill lose everything. dont care. if it goes, it goes. only thing on the raid setup are game saves and stuff.
Contradiction?

Anyway... According to your system specs, you have many more SATA ports than you have hard drives, so can't you just set up a new array to copy your stuff to? (Actually if I were you I'd just use the new drives as individual drives and split the data among them, saving me the RAID headaches in the future.)

Since there's no OS on the drives, a plain copy-paste will work. If there's apps that like to be in certain drive letters, you can do the copying in safe mode, then change the drive letters accordingly before restarting Windows in normal mode.

For instance, I have my data in D:\, and I did this when I swapped hard drives:
1) Turn off computer.
2) Plug in new hard drive.
3) Boot in safe mode.
4) Format new drive as R:\
5) Copy D:\ to R:\
6) In Disk Management, REMOVE the drive letter for D:\
7) In Disk Management, change R:\ to D:\
8) Turn off computer
9) Unplug the old hard drive
10) Boot in normal mode
11) Restart once more to get drivers and things working with the new driver letters

After all this, everything was working as if the files never moved, except they were physically on a new drive. The apps and most components of Windows care what the drive is, fakeRAID, dynamic disk, or otherwise when it's accessing the files.
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Old January 5, 2013, 09:51 AM
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As I said earlier:

Quote:
If you want to continue using such an array, connect the two new drives, create a new RAID 0 array and copy the contents of the old array to the new one. You can then disconnect/repurpose/etc the drives from the original array.
You can't "rebuild" a RAID 0 array since removing one drive destroys the array completely; you have to either copy it as is to another drive or array or recreate it from scratch.
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