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Old February 7, 2012, 06:19 PM
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That is the furtherest thing from accurate though stoanee. Its not worth trying to use software to access a PSU. Good thought though,

-ST

I stand corrected.
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Old February 7, 2012, 06:27 PM
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I stand corrected.
No worries mate, you ment well. Its just so off the scale because they cannot be polled properly with software, unlike doing it with proper hardware.

Its all good

-ST
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Old February 7, 2012, 06:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Soultribunal View Post
I would lean away from bad PSU, but you never know. Even quality PSU's (Corsair is quality) can be bad, and start killing things.
Sometimes it happens with the oddest things, where you have one weak rail (I've seen bad PSU's only kill DVD drives and leave everything else sound).

You also could have just had bad luck on otherwise decent SSD's.

There are PSU testers out there, but they are not going to tell you if your ripple and such are in spec. Just that the rail has power in the correct levels as per its specifications.

I say let the lastest one go in, keep all your stuff backed up and see if it dies.
If it does one more time, replace the PSU.

Or , you could take the off chance it is your PSU and upgrade to something of a newer platform.

-ST
I'll replace the PSU this weekend and not wait for the third SSD to fail. The failed SSDs were always connected to the same rail. I am thinking of a Corsair AX850. Any comments please?
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Old February 7, 2012, 06:37 PM
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Your call, just throwing the idea out there.
The good thing is though if you have the coin to do it, then do it for a new PSU because that gives you something solid and more efficent for future expansion.

AX850 is very solid.

-ST
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Old February 8, 2012, 08:34 AM
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Anyone throwing around the notions of bad cables and / or electrostatic discharge (ESD)? I blame a loose PSU modular cable for killing off three hard disks in my old gaming machine.
Anyway changing the PSU will definitely change the cable...
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Old February 8, 2012, 08:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Soultribunal View Post
Your call, just throwing the idea out there.
The good thing is though if you have the coin to do it, then do it for a new PSU because that gives you something solid and more efficent for future expansion.

AX850 is very solid.

-ST

I replaced the PSU tonight with a Seasonic Platinum 860 which I found to be just a few dolloars more than the Corsair A850. I love the build and the specs. Looks like I am all set for a couple more years as far as Power Supply is concerned. I am crossing my fingers for the SSDs
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Old February 9, 2012, 06:47 AM
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My two cents, in all domains, you always get what you pay for.

...

ok maybe not with governments but you get the point!
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Old February 9, 2012, 07:31 AM
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My two cents, in all domains, you always get what you pay for.

...

ok maybe not with governments but you get the point!
Actually...with governments you get EXACTLY what you pay for. Just like down south...they have the best government the mega corporations could afford. :)~

SF1200...first gen. Always teething issues with first gen. In that case it was mainly a combo of low quality NAND that got past QA and SF making a big deal on how they could use lower grade NAND and still have a better MTBF.

SF2281's got a bit of a bad rap because of the BSOD issues, one of which - the most annoying and toughest to track down IMHO - would cause it to "fall off" and not be recognized in rig 1...but unplugging it overnight and trying in rig 2 would magically make it work. These issues hit only a minor group of people BUT a) was completely random in nature and b) was taken up by the masses (and probably other SF competitors) to make it into a HUGE issue.

SandForce had great engineers...but piss poor firmware department. Thank god they got snarfed up by LSI who know how to actually make GOOD firmware. I doubt we will see such issues in the future when the next gen LSI/SF controller is released.

To the OP: you got a killer good psu now. I truly doubt ripple will ever be an issue (possibly a semi-plugged in cable...but thats pretty rare unless you are not careful). IF you do run into probs. FIRST thing I would do is yank the drive and leave it unplugged overnight. THEN try in a different rig. IF it works...its the mobo and in all likelihood your best bet is either replacing the mobo...or going with a dif mfg'er of SSDs.

Would recommended either the Intel 520 (the ONLY SF2281 that uses custom firmware and thus is a different beast than any of the other SF drives) or a Crucial M4 or Corsair Performance Pro. The last two are Marvel based drives. Some issues with them (occasionally hiccup on NAND dieing early)...BUT thats to be expected from ANY mass produced item and is still great option from quality AND performance compared to HDDS (which a certain percentage die early deaths or are DOA...once again mass produced items == some percent are going to be bad).
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Old March 2, 2012, 12:31 PM
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SSDs are something you *never* want to be on the leading edge of technology for. Personally, I wouldn't touch Intel's new 520 SSD with a ten foot pole. Not because of the Sandforce chipset -- but rather, because it doesn't have a year or two of field experience in actual real-world environments.

You might lose a few IOPS by going with, say, a year and a half old Intel 320 design. Or even some of the older Samsungs. You won't be able to impress the forums with your benchmarks. You might not even use that new-fangled 6GBps SATA controller on your motherboard to its full effect. But there's far less of a likelyhood that you'll be losing data if you pick an older, yet mature design.

This is why, for instance, business laptops don't generally ship with the latest/greatest OCZ product -- they do not want warranty returns, nor to have their reputations damaged with the customer base. The Samsung shipped with my Dell laptop, heck, its gotta be one of the slowest 128gb SSDs out there (180mb/sec reads, 20mb/sec writes) -- but at least its gone 2 years without any data loss.
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