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Old October 21, 2011, 08:11 PM
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Default Boot SSD

Hey linus,
I am building a new computer, i wouldn't even be able to tell you what # build this is, but this IS my first build using an ssd. and since ssd prices are still outlandishly high, ive decided to go with a 60gb ssd that i will only be putting my OS and some key programs on, then i will have another much larger drive for the rest of my programs/games. i have read a few different articles on how to properly set up a boot ssd (I.E. How to: Setup SSD boot drive with secondary Hard disc optimization - Overclock.net - Overclocking.net ) and i was wondering if this is the correct way of doing it, or whether or not i should be doing it another way. the only reason i ask is because i hold your verdict at a very high level. If you could please respond to me when you get a chance, that would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
Chris

P.S. If anyone else has any tips for me, they will not go unappreciated. Thanks

Last edited by ThatGuy1614; October 22, 2011 at 11:49 AM.
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Old October 22, 2011, 01:03 PM
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A great way of saving space is moving the Users, Program Files and ProgramData folders off your SSD, this method still allows Windows Update to function properly.

During the Windows 7 install when it comes time to create a user press "Shift F10"

This should bring up CMD prompt, type in compmgmt.msc ,click "Disk Management" and take note of your SSD's drive letter as well as your regular HDD's drive letter.

Will be assuming SSD = C: HDD = D:
(if not just change as needed)

robocopy "C:\Users" "D:\Users" /E /COPYALL /XJ


robocopy "C:\Program Files" "D:\Program Files" /E /COPYALL /XJ

robocopy "C:\Program Files (x86)" "D:\Program Files (x86)" /E /COPYALL /XJ


robocopy "C:\ProgramData" "D:\ProgramData" /E /COPYALL /XJ


These commands will copy all existing data from your SSD to your HDD

After everything is copied you must delete the old (SSD) folders.

rmdir "C:\Users" /S /Q

rmdir "C:\Program Files" /S /Q

rmdir "C:\Program Files (x86)" /S /Q

rmdir "C:\ProgramData" /S /Q
(might not work, you may have to do when the computer starts up)

Now you must make the links.

mklink /J "C:\Users" "D:\Users"


mklink /J "C:\Program Files" "D:\Program Files"


mklink /J "C:\Program Files (x86)" "D:\Program Files (x86)"


mklink /J "C:\ProgramData" "D:\Program Data"
(might not work, you may have to do when the computer starts up)

Now, you must configure the registry.

Type "regedit" in the CMD prompt

Go to

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Curr entVersion

Edit the ProgramFilesDir and CommonFilesDir keys to show

D:\ instead of %Systemroot%

Now go to

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList

Do the same thing here.

Close CMD prompt and continue installing Windows 7.

***Don't forget to try and remove ProgramData and create the links again***

Also google, "SSD Tweaker" great little app.

-Tronedor

Last edited by Tronedor; October 22, 2011 at 02:03 PM.
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Old October 22, 2011, 01:24 PM
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you're overcomplicating this. if 60GB SSD for OS isn't enuff, then go for a Force GT 90GB or 128GB from kingston or crucial (M4). I have a Crucial C300 64GB for OS and all i did for saving space was, disabled system restore, minimized page file to 300MB (MS says minimum is 250MB), disabled prefetch, and thats about it. my iPhone backups are 7GB and back up to the SSD, which i don't think i can change. i still have 24GB free. when i upgrade i'll be looking for a 128GB so space and performance won't be issues.
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Old October 22, 2011, 01:37 PM
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This method will also help down the road when your Users folder has grown too big to fit on your SSD..

Will also save your data in the event you need to reinstall Windows.

No real reason not to do this will a small boot drive :)
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Old October 22, 2011, 05:56 PM
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Thanks Tronedor for the feedback, so i shouldn't do it the way the article says, and instead do it the command prompt way? and Jurassic, the only reason i'm getting such a small ssd for just the OS is because my Itunes is 60gb alone because of my CD collection, and then there's another 40gb of steam games, its just not in my budget to buy a big enough ssd for everything.
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Old October 22, 2011, 11:31 PM
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Yes, the command prompt way will link the folders, they still show up on the C: drive but will be actually located on the D: drive.

So when you install a program to C:\Program Files, it will actually install on D:\Program Files.

-Tronedor
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