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Old March 16, 2010, 12:04 PM
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Default Why do Drives never match their printed Capacity?

You know how it is...
128GB is like 119GB or 2TB is like 1.86TB...

Anyone know what's the exact cause behind this?

AFAIK it's just mislabeling and f***ed up standardizations, isn't it?
What I mean by f***ed up standardizations, I mean how 1000MB is interpreted as 1GB or 1000GB as 1TB,
although it is actually 1024MB which is 1GB and 1024GB is 1TB.


I bring this up because I forgot and overlooked the fact that 2TB isn't 2TB.
I was anxiously waiting for at least 1.95TB of space to play with since I wanted to dump all
my media files into the 2TB HDD.

Surprise, surprise, it has less than 1.90TB of space... :(
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Old March 16, 2010, 12:34 PM
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Simple, its for the uneducated customers.

Example:
Assume both drives are 1TB and identical in every way except the name:

Company A could sell a drive with its advertised formatted capacity - ie: 960gb Western digital
Company B could sell the same capacity drive and advertise it as 1000gb seagate

People see a bigger number and assume its better and buy company B's drive even though they are the exact same size drive. Of course company B leaves it up to retailer or thier tech support to educate the customer that a GB is actually 1024mb and after formatting you end up with your current compacity.
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Old March 16, 2010, 12:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AERo View Post
AFAIK it's just mislabeling and f***ed up standardizations, isn't it?
What I mean by f***ed up standardizations, I mean how 1000MB is interpreted as 1GB or 1000GB as 1TB,
although it is actually 1024MB which is 1GB and 1024GB is 1TB.
Exactly. Drive manufacturers go by a base 10 system, so 1KB = 10^3 B, 1MB = 10^3 KB, 1GB = 10^3 MB, etc. Windows goes by base 2, so 1KB = 2^10 B, 1MB = 2^10 KB, 1GB = 2^10 MB, etc. With smaller numbers the difference isn't that large, but the difference in notation actually results in a reduction of disk space of about 7%, which gets to be quite a bit when dealing with capacities in the hundreds of gigabytes.
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Old March 16, 2010, 02:52 PM
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The drive manufacturers marketing departments are selling 2 TB drives which have 2,000,000,000,000 bytes of storage. We users (and computers) refer to drives in capacities based on the 2 to the power of - i.e. 1 KB is 1024 bytes. 1 MB is 1024 kb. 1 gb is 1024 mb or 1,073,418,824 bytes or approx 7% more than what the marketers call a GB. When we go to the next level (petabyte? can't remember), it will be about 10% difference (1.024x1.024x1.024x1.024).
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Old March 19, 2010, 11:14 AM
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so when are the Tera-quads gonna come by :) (hehe was watch a star trek show last night and they always say Tera-quads)
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Old March 19, 2010, 06:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patramix View Post
(hehe was watch a star trek show last night and they always say Tera-quads)
That's because in Star Trek they use the term quads to refer to a quantity of data ;). A tera-quad for them would be like one of us saying terabyte (actually, the reason they left it sounding like an ambiguous quantity was specifically so they wouldn't have to deal with the term sounding outdated within a few years).
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