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Old September 25, 2008, 02:05 AM
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Default GIGABYTE Introduces Ultra Durable 3 Motherboard Technology

As an evolution to their well-known Ultra Durable initiative, GIGABYTE has revealed Ultra Durable 3, which continues the three main features of Ultra Durable 2 (Long Lasting Solid Capacitors, Lower RDS(on) Mosfets, Ferrite Core Chokes), but also adds 2 ounces of copper for both the Power and Ground PCB layers, which is up from the usual 0.5 or 1 ounce that is found on traditional motherboards.

What does new copper infusion achieve? Here's what they had to say:

"Taipei, Taiwan, September 24th, 2008 – GIGABYTE UNITED INC., a leading manufacturer of motherboards and graphics cards today is pleased to introduce their revolutionary Ultra Durable 3 technology, the industry’s first consumer desktop motherboard design to feature 2 ounces of copper for both the Power and Ground layers, delivering a dramatically lower system temperature, improved energy efficiency and enhanced stability for overclocking.
GIGABYTE once again leads the motherboard industry for the highest quality, most innovative motherboard design with the launch of their latest Ultra Durable 3 technology. Ultra Durable 3 motherboards are the first consumer desktop motherboards to feature double the amount of copper for the Power and Ground layers of the PCB. Most traditional motherboard designs utilize a single ounce of copper for each layer, whereas GIGABYTE’s ultra Durable 3 motherboards feature 2 ounces per layer.

Benefits of 2 oz Copper design

Doubling the amount of copper provides a more effective thermal cooling solution by delivering a more efficient spreading of heat from critical areas of the motherboard such as the CPU power zone throughout the entire PCB. In fact, GIGABYTE Ultra Durable 3 motherboards are able to deliver up to 50°C cooler working temperatures than traditional motherboards.

In addition, doubling the amount of copper lowers the PCB impedance by 2X. Impedance is a measure of how much the circuit impedes the flow of current. The less the flow of current is impeded, the less amount of energy is wasted. For GIGABYTE Ultra Durable 3 motherboards, this means total PCB electrical waste is reduced by 2X, which also means less heat is generated. 2 ounces of copper also provides improved signal quality, providing better system stability and allowing for greater margins for overclocking."
Here are some promotional images that I have photographed directly from the marketing pamphlet, they aren't flawless but this is gunshot reporting!




I will be following this up with pictures of the actual Ultra Durable 3 motherboards shortly, so stay tuned for that.
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Old September 25, 2008, 05:12 AM
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Considering the price of copper these days, this will add to the price of mobos.

Somcehting else that concerns me is the simple fact that sometimes keeping heat localized is better than dispersing it. Case and point: if you look at the thermal imaging shots, you can see that the copper layer transports what looks like a significant portion of the heat from the VRM area and partially transports it to the CPU socket area. This could very well increase CPU temps or put additional stress on other parts of the mobo which aren't designed for the heat which will be dispersed through the PCB.
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Old September 25, 2008, 10:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SKYMTL View Post
Considering the price of copper these days, this will add to the price of mobos.
Actually, the price for the EP45-UD3R is projected to be the about same as the current EP45-DS3R . Although the extra ounce of copper will increase PCB manufacturing costs and complexity, Gigabyte feels that they can achieve this without it adding a noticeable price premium to the UD3 models.

Quote:
Somcehting else that concerns me is the simple fact that sometimes keeping heat localized is better than dispersing it. Case and point: if you look at the thermal imaging shots, you can see that the copper layer transports what looks like a significant portion of the heat from the VRM area and partially transports it to the CPU socket area. This could very well increase CPU temps or put additional stress on other parts of the mobo which aren't designed for the heat which will be dispersed through the PCB.
Good points, however from what I understood, by doubling the amount of copper used in the PCB layers they were not only able to effectively use these layers as heatsinks for the hot bits that are anchored into them (MOSFETs & etc), but they were also able to halve the PCB's electrical resistance and reduce heat generation, so although a greater percentage of heat may be being transfered to the CPU socket area there is still overall less heat being transfered to the area.

Regarding your other concerns, the one aspect that was made explictly clear during my presentation on Ultra Durable 3 was that the overall component durability is second to none. The UD3 series was designed with extremely high tolerances, and in-lab testing was done at 75 degrees celsius, which is significantly higher than the 40-50C industry average. It may seem like overkill, but they had enough confidence in their design (particularly in the quality of their solid capacitors) that raising their testing standards was just a natural progression.

If any of this doesn't make any sense, I'll try to clear it up when I'm in a less zombie-like state
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Old September 25, 2008, 12:13 PM
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178 degrees? If you have those kind of temperatures, I'd say that you have problems that go beyond needing an extra ounce of copper stuffed into the PCB. You either need more phases or decent heatsinks. That aside, this is the sort of thing I'd like to see happening on video cards, (as opposed to certain manufacturers suggestions to actually make the boards thinner).

I'm not quite a fan of Gigabyte's BIOS layouts, but this is the sort of thing that might make it worth putting up with. Either that, or the other manufacturers will move to match this sort of thing.

If you have any shots of finalized heatsink designs, Mac, that would be nice. They seem to be absent from Gigabyte promo shots thus far.
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Old September 25, 2008, 12:44 PM
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I suspect the power (heat) reduction because of less resistance in the power plane is about half of almost nothing.
A solid ground plane is always good for noise.
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Old September 25, 2008, 03:33 PM
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Yeah, I don't see the point of showing us the differences at 178C. I doubt that 99%+ of people who use this board will permit it to go above 70C or so.
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Old September 25, 2008, 07:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MAC View Post

Doubling the amount of copper provides a more effective thermal cooling solution by delivering a more efficient spreading of heat from critical areas of the motherboard such as the CPU power zone throughout the entire PCB.
I’m sorry, but I must have missed something; it seems logical to me that if an UD3 Board is absorbing more heat than its one layer counterpart & receives the same nominal cooling its temperature will gradually increase over time until the UD3 board is even hotter than its single layer counterpart.

How can this be advantageous for 24/7 Full Load usage?

Regards, Dizz
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Old September 25, 2008, 09:38 PM
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Ultimately, whatever path it takes in-between, the heat needs to be dissipated into the air (where it can be carried away for good). The speed at which this happens is highly dependent on 1) the temperature difference between the component and the air, and 2) the surface area actually exposed to the air.

In theory, letting the heat spread out more should improve factor number two, which will allow factor number one to be reduced, which translates into lower temperatures. In theory, anyway. But as also mentioned, the lower impedance should also make for less heat created in the first place.
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Old September 26, 2008, 10:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MpG View Post

In theory, letting the heat spread out more should improve factor number two, which will allow factor number one to be reduced, which translates into lower temperatures. In theory, anyway. But as also mentioned, the lower impedance should also make for less heat created in the first place.
This.


Looking forward to this board.
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