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-   -   220V UPS Backup Systems? (http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/power-supplies/56920-220v-ups-backup-systems.html)

PcWizTech September 25, 2012 09:21 AM

220V UPS Backup Systems?
 
Hello everyone,

Many people know that I've recently built my first ever custom PC. Everything is well (i think haha). Sadly, i still have to get a UPS drive for the frequent power outage my house suffers from. Unfortunately, however, I'm overseas and currently living here in Spain. The Voltage here is 220V as opposed to 120V in the states. I don't mind the company/website as long as its reliable, but does anyone have any idea where i can find a 220V UPS Backup system? Many thanks!

*Looking for something 650w-900w max.

Soultribunal September 25, 2012 10:24 AM

APC is the first one that comes to mind. They should have a Back UPS series as well like this one:

Power-Saving Back-UPS Pro 1200, 230V, Schuko

Should do the trick,

-ST

PcWizTech September 25, 2012 01:41 PM

Since it has an input of 230v will it shock/burn my components? Sorry, I'm not that advanced with it comes to electrical terms.

frontier204 September 25, 2012 02:11 PM

I'm just a little confused... So you're running your PC in Spain and also need the UPS there? (If you're going to be using the UPS in the USA you're better off just buying one in the USA so you don't kill your efficiency with some converter.)

Assuming you're using that Corsair PSU in your "My system specs", you'll be fine: Enthusiast Series
The PSU accepts anywhere between 90V-264V.
In the same way, the UPS Soul posted accepts 176 - 294V by default, although the range is adjustable in the software (anything higher or lower and it switches to battery).

They call it 110V or 220V because they expect losses in your house's wiring and such to bring it down from the 120V or 230V. Essentially something designed for "220V" and something designed for "230V" are the same.

grinder September 25, 2012 07:07 PM

been using cyberpower products over the last year with great success. :)

UPS Backup | Power Supply | Emergency Power Systems ? CyberPower Systems, Inc.

good bang for buck, and has support for vmware n stuff

PcWizTech September 26, 2012 05:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frontier204 (Post 657925)
I'm just a little confused... So you're running your PC in Spain and also need the UPS there? (If you're going to be using the UPS in the USA you're better off just buying one in the USA so you don't kill your efficiency with some converter.)

Assuming you're using that Corsair PSU in your "My system specs", you'll be fine: Enthusiast Series
The PSU accepts anywhere between 90V-264V.
In the same way, the UPS Soul posted accepts 176 - 294V by default, although the range is adjustable in the software (anything higher or lower and it switches to battery).

They call it 110V or 220V because they expect losses in your house's wiring and such to bring it down from the 120V or 230V. Essentially something designed for "220V" and something designed for "230V" are the same.

The corsair PSU i'm using is a spanish one. The reason i want a UPS system is so that if my power goes out, i have enough time to shut down all my equipment. This will help me (hopefully) from getting bad hardware and/or corrupt files.
Since i live in spain, i need one for spain's voltage not US.

Sagath September 26, 2012 06:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PcWizTech (Post 658027)
The corsair PSU i'm using is a spanish one. The reason i want a UPS system is so that if my power goes out, i have enough time to shut down all my equipment. This will help me (hopefully) from getting bad hardware and/or corrupt files.
Since i live in spain, i need one for spain's voltage not US.

APC Back-UPS 400, 230V, Spain

Change wattage to suit needs. You could also probably go with a different one, so that when you come back to NA you can bring the UPS with you if you wanted, and heres why:

Electronics 'generally' are designed for multiple purpose. Differing wall plugs require different cords (the UPS I linked has your 'spanish' style receptacles), but that can usually be swapped with a different plug for other locations on your PSU (for say, when you move back to NA). There is also usually a 110/220v switch on the back of PSUs, so your corsair SPU is probably not 'spanish', per se, but has the ability to be such by using both a spanish plug cord, and the 220 switch.

The 110/220 or 120/240v thing is a common misconception too. Outlet power is almost never perfect, and varys depending on day, provider load, and location/distance. AC to DC power converting devices or UPS devices are normally designed to work within a given (usually large) voltage range. You can see the specs on the UPS site, some of the foreign ones are designed for 160-280ish volts for countries with poor regulation! :shok:.

Anyways, I could go on, but hopefully that clears it up. If you have more questions, I'll try to clarify:thumb:

Soultribunal September 26, 2012 06:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sagath (Post 658033)
APC Back-UPS 400, 230V, Spain

Change wattage to suit needs. You could also probably go with a different one, so that when you come back to NA you can bring the UPS with you if you wanted, and heres why:

Electronics 'generally' are designed for multiple purpose. Differing wall plugs require different cords (the UPS I linked has your 'spanish' style receptacles), but that can usually be swapped with a different plug for other locations on your PSU (for say, when you move back to NA). There is also usually a 110/220v switch on the back of PSUs, so your corsair SPU is probably not 'spanish', per se, but has the ability to be such by using both a spanish plug cord, and the 220 switch.

The 110/220 or 120/240v thing is a common misconception too. Outlet power is almost never perfect, and varys depending on day, provider load, and location/distance. AC to DC power converting devices or UPS devices are normally designed to work within a given (usually large) voltage range. You can see the specs on the UPS site, some of the foreign ones are designed for 160-280ish volts for countries with poor regulation! :shok:.

Anyways, I could go on, but hopefully that clears it up. If you have more questions, I'll try to clarify:thumb:

I'd like to note that almost all Modern PSU's worth there name have auto Sensing for Voltage and no longer a switch (those that don't are cheap, and I wouldn't be using them to power my system lol), only the plug changes as far as I know. So his Spanish PSU will work here just with different plug :)
Thats why I linked the APC unit that has those style of connectors as well :)

-ST

Sagath September 26, 2012 06:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Soultribunal (Post 658034)
I'd like to note that almost all Modern PSU's worth there name have auto Sensing for Voltage and no longer a switch (those that don't are cheap, and I wouldn't be using them to power my system lol), only the plug changes as far as I know. So his Spanish PSU will work here just with different plug :)
Thats why I linked the APC unit that has those style of connectors as well :)

-ST

Touche salesman! You're correct, as my XFX doesnt have a switch. Guess I'll have to start saying "Well back in MY day, we had to flip a switch before walking our dinosaurs uphill, bothways to work!" And the plugs I was just clarifying on a bit better as to why he could use yours :thumb: We work well together ST. You should buy me more beer as a reciprocation for my hard work. :haha:

PcWizTech September 26, 2012 08:41 AM

Okay two quick questions.

1) Are you saying i can buy a 120v output PSU and it will still work here in spain?

2) Secondly, the PSU in my pc is 650w. Do i need a UPS higher than 650w? I might just get something about 800w


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