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Old August 26, 2012, 12:38 PM
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Smile Modular or non-modular?

I just recently ordered a non-modular Corsair TX750 V2, not knowing what modular meant, so my question is:
Should I send back my non-modular PSU and order a fully modular version instead?
Pros and cons?
Thanks
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Old August 26, 2012, 12:43 PM
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The reason for a modular PSU is only so that you don't have extra cables that aren't being used that you have to hide. If this isn't important to you, keep your TX750. It's a good PSU.
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Old August 28, 2012, 05:38 AM
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Less case clutter means better air flow, if temps are a concern.
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Old August 28, 2012, 11:04 AM
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The downside to a modular supply is mechanical wear on contacts, potential multiple points of failure, and power losses (however slight) at each connector. PC Power & Cooling had an excellent article on their website a few years ago about the drawbacks and benefits of modular vs n0n-modular PSU's. Not sure if it's still there after the OCZ remake.
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Old August 28, 2012, 03:51 PM
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Since PCP&C now sells modular supplies with 120 mm or larger fans, I doubt it. Then again, it was such a piece of FUD that it was really not worth paying attention to in the first place. It claimed PCP&C used 80 mm fans because it left room for larger and more robust components than did a 120 mm fan. Not mentioned was they were producing power supplies with the same components (Seasonic as OEM) as used in PSUs with 120 mm fans.
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Most low-noise ATX power supplies today utilize a top-mounted 120mm fan rather than a rear-mounted 80mm fan. The 120's favorable reputation is based on the fact that under low to medium load conditions, the 120mm fan provides sufficient cooling at low RPM and low RPM fans are generally very quiet.

However, problems occur with this design when the load exceeds 50%-60%. Because the 120mm fan consumes about 1.5" of vertical space inside the PSU, heat sinks, capacitors, and other components are about 30% smaller in height compared to a PSU with a rear-mounted fan. The smaller parts can handle less current, so the maximum power available with the 120mm design is limited. And, because the heat sinks have less surface area, more air flow is needed with this design to keep the thermal situation under control. With 80%-100% load, the 120's fan speed can double and the noise level can jump by up to 20dB.

In conclusion, for systems that require more than 50% of the power supply's capacity, a well-engineered PSU with a rear-mounted 80mm fan will provide superior performance and reliability (due to larger components) at a noise level comparable to a PSU equipped with a 120mm fan.
I recall the discussion of the "myths" page on the PCP&C site being removed in early 2010 when they introduced the revamped Silencer series with 135 mm fans, ironically coinciding with Seasonic no longer producing the Silencer line.
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Old August 29, 2012, 09:54 AM
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I really wasn't talking about components or fans/cooling but the benefits vs drawbacks of continuous conductors vs plugable cables. Those are valid regardless of the supply or who makes it.

Whether those considerations are important to a buyer, or in their situation impact their usage is for them to determine.
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Old September 4, 2012, 07:22 AM
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I'm considering a modular PSU mainly to save space in my itx NAS build. Not much room for cable management so the fewer the cables, the better.
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Old September 4, 2012, 07:53 AM
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If you have an atx case then there will be no issue with tucking the extra cables away (behind motherboard or in hdd cages etc..)
If you have a smaller case then it very well may be worth sending back.. all depends on how you manage the cables with the space you have.
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