Hardware Canucks

Hardware Canucks (http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/)
-   Power Supplies (http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/power-supplies/)
-   -   I am wondering about differences between gold and bronze PSU (http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/power-supplies/55181-i-am-wondering-about-differences-between-gold-bronze-psu.html)

Shadowmeph July 2, 2012 10:05 AM

I am wondering about differences between gold and bronze PSU
 
When it comes to saving Power and Money ,is there any Real world differences between the Gold and Bronze PSU's specifically on a folding machine like my server, if I was to switch out the current standard psu with a gold one how much of a difference will I see in savings? would it actually be worth it for me to buy a gold PSU and change it out?

enaberif July 2, 2012 10:50 AM

Bronze, Silver, and Gold is just a way to measure the efficiency of the supply at 80% load.

80 PLUS - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

See the chart.

JD July 2, 2012 03:16 PM

In the long run it'll be worthwhile for sure, but I'm not sure I could recommend swapping out a bronze for a gold. If you need a new PSU, obviously get the gold though.

Depends how much power your pulling though. If it's say 300W, then the difference between gold and bronze is not going to be much. If you're pulling upwards of 800W, then it may be worth it.

Galcobar July 2, 2012 04:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by enaberif (Post 638934)
Bronze, Silver, and Gold is just a way to measure the efficiency of the supply at 80% load.

80 PLUS - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

See the chart.


Sorry, no that's not correct.

The 80 Plus standard is the efficiency target -- as in 80 per cent or more of the energy pulled from the wall by the PSU is delivered to the computer. It's named for the expected efficiency at 20 per cent load. The standard sets minimum efficiency levels for loads at 20, 50 and 100 per cent of the PSU's capacity.

80 Plus Bronze, Silver, Gold and Platinum set progressively higher targets for the PSU's efficiency.

Whether it's worth the extra costs depends purely upon your application. Figure out how much electricity you use, how much less you'd use with a more efficient power supply, multiply the difference by the cost of electricity in your area, and compare that to the premium of buying a more efficient PSU.

Shadowmeph July 2, 2012 06:10 PM

ok which tool do I need to find out how much electricity my Folder is pulling from the wall and where can I find it?

Quote:

Power supply
Desktop computer power supplies (PSUs) are in general 7075% efficient,[41] dissipating the remaining energy as heat. An industry initiative called 80 PLUS certifies PSUs that are at least 80% efficient; typically these models are drop-in replacements for older, less efficient PSUs of the same form factor.[42] As of July 20, 2007, all new Energy Star 4.0-certified desktop PSUs must be at least 80% efficient.[43]
I did not know this that it actually just wastes less energy the PC still uses the same amount just watt is left over turns into heat.

Hmm so basically a cooler PSU would be more efficient meaning a better fan,exhaust and heats sinks would be better. ok now I am confused

Bond007 July 2, 2012 06:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JD (Post 638992)
In the long run it'll be worthwhile for sure, but I'm not sure I could recommend swapping out a bronze for a gold. If you need a new PSU, obviously get the gold though.

Depends how much power your pulling though. If it's say 300W, then the difference between gold and bronze is not going to be much. If you're pulling upwards of 800W, then it may be worth it.

Agree. If you want to know exactly how much power you are pulling you will need to buy a power meter that goes better the outlet and your power cord.

Shadowmeph July 2, 2012 06:20 PM

which are decent power meter brands

Bond007 July 2, 2012 06:59 PM

Never had one. They use to have one cheap at canadian tire, but I don't see it anymore. Quick search and there is one at homedepot to give you an idea what I mean. As for specifics I can't really help.

RYOBI | Enpower Appliance Meter | Home Depot Canada

Galcobar July 2, 2012 07:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shadowmeph (Post 639029)
Hmm so basically a cooler PSU would be more efficient meaning a better fan,exhaust and heats sinks would be better. ok now I am confused

You're confusing energy use with energy dissipation.

What you want is a PSU which creates less heat, meaning it wastes less energy. What you described is a PSU which is better at getting rid of heat -- but bigger fans, heatsinks and the like don't reduce the amount of energy wasted, they just disperse it more quickly into the air.

There's a caveat to that, of course, in that a cooler PSU should be more efficient than the same PSU running at a hotter temperature. This is why reviewers such as jonnyguru.com stick thier PSUs into a hotbox to see what the PSU can do with higher temperatures (so your conclusion is correct but not for the reason you thought). However, real gains in PSU efficiency come from the quality of the design and of the components in the power circuitry rather than the cooling capacity.

First you want to design a PSU which wastes less energy as heat. Then you worry about getting rid of the heat it does generate. The nice thing is that a PSU which starts out as efficient (generates little heat) stays efficient because it's not generating enough heat to affect itself, and because a quality design and components are less susceptible to heat-induced inefficiency.

JD July 2, 2012 08:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bond007 (Post 639041)
Never had one. They use to have one cheap at canadian tire, but I don't see it anymore. Quick search and there is one at homedepot to give you an idea what I mean. As for specifics I can't really help.

RYOBI | Enpower Appliance Meter | Home Depot Canada

Canadian Tire's power meter was/is the Blue Planet EM100. I have one and it does the trick.

On the whole heat/efficiency front, this is why Corsair's AX series and Seasonic's X series run fanless until they reach 20% load


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:11 AM.