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Old March 25, 2008, 11:50 AM
SKYMTL's Avatar
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Not necessarily but there is that too.

Think of a power supply like a car engine . A car engine is happy when it stays under a certain number of RPMs and now and then it is OK to floor it, pump those RPMs into the high thousands and get your groove on. BUT, (speed limits aside) if you always drove like Schumacher at Imola and redlined your car every day for hours a day, it would seriously shorten the lifespan of your engine.

The same goes for power supplies. You should always build a "buffer" zone into your purchase of a power supply. This means that you should OVER BUY so your power supply will not always be running near its limit. If you buy say a 600W PSU for a computer that will draw 500W, you are too close to its limit and you could be seriously shortening the lifespan of your power supply.
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Old March 25, 2008, 12:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SKYMTL View Post
The same goes for power supplies. You should always build a "buffer" zone into your purchase of a power supply. This means that you should OVER BUY so your power supply will not always be running near its limit. If you buy say a 600W PSU for a computer that will draw 500W, you are too close to its limit and you could be seriously shortening the lifespan of your power supply.
Okay. But what about this:
CorsairTX at 650W can handle up to 780W
and the
CorsairTX at 750W can handle up to 900W
before they shutdown due to overload.

I think that the CorsairTX at 650W(my current powersupply) would be able to drive two graphics cards in SLI or Crossfire without that I'm risking anything, but... I'm afraid that it will not be very quiet at that load. :-(

I don't know about other brands how good they can handle output which is higher than specified, but what do you think about Corsair if you compare it at the way you wrote about the car engine? Is it okay, you think?
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Old March 25, 2008, 02:02 PM
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You are talking about peak output versus sustained output. Peak output is a one-shot deal where the PSU is being pushed FAR beyond what it was spec'd for. There are other things like deration due to temperatures that need to be taken into account as well which will occur in any closed-case real world environment.

I gave my anology due to the fact that not all PSUs are made equally and it is a good mantra to go by.
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