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Old December 24, 2008, 08:35 AM
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How are the volts on the two PSUs? I'm a little concerned about the one that's not attached to the motherboard, because some cheap PSUs have very messed up voltages if they don't have a load on their +5V and +3.3V lines.
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Old December 24, 2008, 09:47 AM
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Nice job there Infiniti! If you want to head out to a lan party all you need is a grocery bag and throw that baby in there and go
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Old December 24, 2008, 12:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ImmaPC View Post
Second time it worked for a little bit and then one PSU went kaput. They were both OEM 400W's, XD.
Maybe you attempted to run your PSU without any load on any voltage outputs - As to shorting out and breaker going off, sounds like you had other things on the same circuit and you were near the maximum.... Some newer more expensive PSUs have built in protection circuitry but the cheap generic or standard range PSUs don't.

I think it's pointless to run 2 PSUs, heat, noise and waste....... So get one good PSU preferably a rating above what you need so it won't run under constant stress. I've been running off the Antec High Efficiency series and very happy - never had the need to use 2 PSUs.....
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Old December 24, 2008, 02:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yamawho View Post
Interesting ...

So they would both turn on when the power button on the front is pushed ?
If I did it that way, then yes, they would both recieve a power good signal, since they are spliced together, and both would turn on. The downside is that both PSUs will kind of be permanently stuck together, so its not that good for testing purposes.

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Originally Posted by matsta31 View Post
Wow, I see you even have a cold cathode for the bling factor ?
Haha, yeah I was just playing with them.

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Nice job there Infiniti! If you want to head out to a lan party all you need is a grocery bag and throw that baby in there and go
Yeah.. This gives me an idea..

Right now, it was running perfectly fine overnight, so I think it'll be fine.
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Old December 24, 2008, 07:13 PM
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Okay, right now, I got the second PSU running with a relay. Now, when I press the power button, both PSUs turn on. Suh-weet!
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Old January 17, 2009, 10:08 AM
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I suppose i can consider myself a tad bit of an authority on this, as i use 3 400w gutted and bridged with a 1F capacitor to run a 600w Kenwood amp :)

From an electronics standpoint, what you're doing isn't safe. Powersupplies have internal resistance and active resistance.
Unless you have 2 identical power supplies, do NOT chain them. What will happen is that one will provide a load for the other, and if they don't soon die, you'll simply end up with either a slight bit more power or possibly even less power then with a single psu.

Since some don't have protection circuitry and others are simply poorly designed, reactivity may simply blow one of your psu's, and worse yet spike through your 12v and 5v lines... killing your rig. Not recommended.

If the power supplies are identical though, by all means! They'll have identical resistances and will give close to double the power :) Powering on the second psu by hand though isn't very recommended :)
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Old January 18, 2009, 01:08 PM
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I admit i'm jealous of a guy who 'just has a 4870 lying around'. :)
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Old January 18, 2009, 09:27 PM
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LOL. We've found the latest and greatest portable computer case: The Plastic Grocery Bag.
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Old January 18, 2009, 10:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DarKStar View Post
Maybe you attempted to run your PSU without any load on any voltage outputs - As to shorting out and breaker going off, sounds like you had other things on the same circuit and you were near the maximum.... Some newer more expensive PSUs have built in protection circuitry but the cheap generic or standard range PSUs don't.

I think it's pointless to run 2 PSUs, heat, noise and waste....... So get one good PSU preferably a rating above what you need so it won't run under constant stress. I've been running off the Antec High Efficiency series and very happy - never had the need to use 2 PSUs.....
Nope, just my monitor, and the computer. And if there's no load on voltage output, I have two questions. 1) What does that mean? 2) How would that make my wall outlet short/cause the PSU to fail?
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Old January 22, 2009, 09:44 AM
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Quote:
Nope, just my monitor, and the computer. And if there's no load on voltage output, I have two questions. 1) What does that mean? 2) How would that make my wall outlet short/cause the PSU to fail?
You should have a load on an ATX power supply for it to work properly, if you’re only using the 12V rail then putting a power resister the other rails helps to even out the voltages. There are many guides on the net for converting an ATX power supply in to a LAB power supply or a power supply for RC hobby. They use power resisters in most of the guides in order for the power supply to function correctly.
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