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Old September 9, 2008, 06:24 PM
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Default OCing effects on PowerConsumption

How does overclocking affect your power consumption? I have my e6600 overclocked to 3.26, I know I dont need to worry right now with the 600w power supply, but how much does it actually affect it, I have heard talk about it but never like an answer, just people asking the question.
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Old September 10, 2008, 01:38 AM
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my ups has an lcd on it that is set to display the current load being drawn in watts (its an apc back-ups XS 1500). im not sure how accurate it is, or if it refreshes fast enough to show the true peaks, but ill tell you what it says im using...(keep in mind i also have my monitor and some other junk plugged in to it too).

-running cpu at stock it seemed to idle around 149 watts, cant remember under load because i started overclocking it right away
-idling right now at 3.4 ghz is 164w
-under load @3.4(orthos) it goes to 215w
-running crysis it has hit 290-300w

the stock speed and crysis numbers are from memory (i obsessively watch that little screen ), but this is making me want to do some more scientific monitoring, return my cpu and ram to stock and get some more solid results. anyone have any idea if the output is accurate enough to bother trying to collect results from? is anyone actually interested in seeing some idle/load/gaming results at stock and overclocked speeds?
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Old September 10, 2008, 04:41 AM
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Roughly my Q9550 @ 2GHz is about 280W and @ 3.2GHz about 350W (total system power)
This is with no over voltage.
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Old September 10, 2008, 04:57 AM
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A common rule of thumb that I've often heard is that a CPU's power consumption goes up in proportion to it's clock speed, but increases exponentially to it's voltage.

There are plenty of exceptions to this rule, but the voltages increases are what tends to make your power consumption shoot up the fastest.
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Old September 10, 2008, 05:03 AM
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If you wanted a good place to do some research on the topic, the best place to start would be searches on FAH (folding @ home) forums. There are many folks with folding farms who've done a lot of comparison testing to find the most efficient setups WRT power consumption vrs output.
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Old September 10, 2008, 09:28 AM
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True MpG, Power = current squared times resistance. Doubling voltage doubles the current
Eg. 1volt and 1 ohm = 1W, but 2V and 1Ohm = 4 W.

Changing frequency is a little more tricky but is mostly a function of Capacitance, which is generally fixed.
But I wouldn’t say its totally linear, it depends on the materials. Resistance, capacitance, and inductance all have a temperature curve.
Some negative, some positive. Since there is no way for us to know what these are,
its just best to call it linear within +- 5% of the temperature ranges we use and leave it at that.
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