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Old September 2, 2008, 07:53 PM
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Question Hi, new to O/Cing want some tips

Hello everyone, I am relatively new to the forums, but have been using Hardware Canucks for a while for some reviews and other stuff. I have always loved computers and loved building them, but have never really delved into overclocking, which brings me here :) .

So, if you see in my sig you can see the specs of my computer, I know the e6600 is capable of some good overclocking as well as my memory (e6600 and ReaperX HPC enhanced bandwidth) My video card is factory O/Ced so I don't think it needs it (But I do believe it can go further than what it is at, opinions on if i should OC it further?).

I am basically just looking for some pointers for a pretty much complete newbie, I know some from a bit of reading but not a whole lot. I am wondering where to start, what increments to increase in to test stability, and if anyone knows of similar systems and know what mine might be capable of.

Thanks for any help you can offer,
Kyle
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Old September 2, 2008, 10:32 PM
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Welcome to HWC Gooses. It's a pretty broad question that you are asking.

My best advice would be to learn a little more about the capabilities of your hardware. Take baby steps until you have a better understanding of the process. We all probably learned the most by reading available "how to's".

how to OC - Google Search

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Old September 3, 2008, 03:52 AM
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Without gettting into specifics, there are 6 main tweaks you'll need to concern yourself with to get started in the world of Intel Overclocking.

FSB - Increasing the front side bus speed has a direct effect on CPU and Memory speeds. Raise it in small increments (5 - 10) and check general stability by booting into windows to run a quick stress test. (Super-Pi, Orthos, or OCCT are decent quick checks). Write down all settings as you are doing them, you'll need to know how far was "too far" when your computer refuses to boot. Repeat until the system becomes unstable.

CPU Multiplier - The clock speed of your CPU is based on a multiple of your FSB, hence if your multiplier is 9 and your FSB is 266 your clock speed will be 2394 (rounded up to 2.4). If you raise your FSB to 275, the clock speed of your CPU will be 9 X 275 = 2475. CPU multipliers on consumer grade processors can be lowered, but not raised above the default so if you set your FSB to 300 and selected a multiplier of 8 your CPU would be back to running stock clock speeds of 2400 (2.4).

Memory Ratio - Memory speeds are also affected by FSB, but as a fraction of it. Running memory 1:1 means that your memory speed will change in direct relation to FSB, hence a FSB of 400 @ 1:1 will give you 2 X 400 = 800 (X2 because it is DDR). Dropping the memory ratio will lower your memory's clock speed in relation to FSB and is vital to the overclocking process. As you overclock the FSB, it's best to initially set the memory ratio low to ensure that you aren't pushing the memory beyond what it is capable of.

Vcore (CPU Voltage) - As you raise the clock speed of your CPU it will reach a point where it is no longer able to run stable. Just like giving a little bit more gas to an automobile engine to get the car up a hill, you can raise the CPU voltage (very small increments) to give it the power it needs to get the work done. This is where you really need to ensure that you are monitoring system temps, and have done your research to see what is generally accepted as "safe".

NB Voltage - Your Northbridge is basically the link between the CPU and the rest of your motherboard components. Just like your CPU Voltages, as you raise FSB speeds it's going to get to a point where it is no longer able to run stable and a small bump to NB voltage will give it the power it needs to run at higher frequencies. As with CPU voltages, this is where you start living on the edge, and must ensure that you are monitoring temperatures and using what are considered "safe" tweaks to this setting.

VDimm (Memory voltage) - As you either raise your memory speeds above default, or tweak your settings "tighter" than default you may need to bump your memory voltage up as well. 2.1V is generally accepted as a "Safe" setting for most sticks of DDR2, with many folks feeling comfortable with 2.2 or 2.3V.

Those are the main settings you'll need to concern yourself with as you start. There are many other settings which affect your ability to overclock, but finding those settings is a big part of the fun.

Best advice is to take it slow, and don't get caught up on what clock speeds other folks are getting. Every combination of hardware is going to react differently to being taken out of default specs. Find out what your particular combination is capable of first, and then have a look around at other setups to see if maybe there is something else you can do to achieve a higher OC.

Keep an eye on your temps, stress test as you go, and don't forget to write down what settings are working for you. Nothing worse than wanting to return to a stable OC, but not being able to remember what all of the settings are.

Above all.... have fun!!! It's not a contest. Think of it like a puzzle that requires a fair bit of work and a lot of patience.
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Old September 3, 2008, 09:24 AM
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Hey, now I am having a problem.. On the motherboard I have set it all the manual so I can overclock and I am trying to change the FSB QDR for my CPU and I set it, I save and exit, it reboots, but then if I go back into the setup the FSB is set to auto again... I cant find away to make it stick!
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Old September 3, 2008, 01:57 PM
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Also, it doesnt appear that my voltage will stick either :(
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Old September 3, 2008, 02:42 PM
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Try removing your battery and clearing CMOS. I've had issues like that in the past and that usually fixed it.
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Old September 3, 2008, 04:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sswilson View Post
Without gettting into specifics, there are 6 main tweaks you'll need to concern yourself with to get started in the world of Intel Overclocking.

FSB - Increasing the front side bus speed has a direct effect on CPU and Memory speeds. Raise it in small increments (5 - 10) and check general stability by booting into windows to run a quick stress test. (Super-Pi, Orthos, or OCCT are decent quick checks). Write down all settings as you are doing them, you'll need to know how far was "too far" when your computer refuses to boot. Repeat until the system becomes unstable.

CPU Multiplier - The clock speed of your CPU is based on a multiple of your FSB, hence if your multiplier is 9 and your FSB is 266 your clock speed will be 2394 (rounded up to 2.4). If you raise your FSB to 275, the clock speed of your CPU will be 9 X 275 = 2475. CPU multipliers on consumer grade processors can be lowered, but not raised above the default so if you set your FSB to 300 and selected a multiplier of 8 your CPU would be back to running stock clock speeds of 2400 (2.4).

Memory Ratio - Memory speeds are also affected by FSB, but as a fraction of it. Running memory 1:1 means that your memory speed will change in direct relation to FSB, hence a FSB of 400 @ 1:1 will give you 2 X 400 = 800 (X2 because it is DDR). Dropping the memory ratio will lower your memory's clock speed in relation to FSB and is vital to the overclocking process. As you overclock the FSB, it's best to initially set the memory ratio low to ensure that you aren't pushing the memory beyond what it is capable of.

Vcore (CPU Voltage) - As you raise the clock speed of your CPU it will reach a point where it is no longer able to run stable. Just like giving a little bit more gas to an automobile engine to get the car up a hill, you can raise the CPU voltage (very small increments) to give it the power it needs to get the work done. This is where you really need to ensure that you are monitoring system temps, and have done your research to see what is generally accepted as "safe".

NB Voltage - Your Northbridge is basically the link between the CPU and the rest of your motherboard components. Just like your CPU Voltages, as you raise FSB speeds it's going to get to a point where it is no longer able to run stable and a small bump to NB voltage will give it the power it needs to run at higher frequencies. As with CPU voltages, this is where you start living on the edge, and must ensure that you are monitoring temperatures and using what are considered "safe" tweaks to this setting.

VDimm (Memory voltage) - As you either raise your memory speeds above default, or tweak your settings "tighter" than default you may need to bump your memory voltage up as well. 2.1V is generally accepted as a "Safe" setting for most sticks of DDR2, with many folks feeling comfortable with 2.2 or 2.3V.

Those are the main settings you'll need to concern yourself with as you start. There are many other settings which affect your ability to overclock, but finding those settings is a big part of the fun.

Best advice is to take it slow, and don't get caught up on what clock speeds other folks are getting. Every combination of hardware is going to react differently to being taken out of default specs. Find out what your particular combination is capable of first, and then have a look around at other setups to see if maybe there is something else you can do to achieve a higher OC.

Keep an eye on your temps, stress test as you go, and don't forget to write down what settings are working for you. Nothing worse than wanting to return to a stable OC, but not being able to remember what all of the settings are.

Above all.... have fun!!! It's not a contest. Think of it like a puzzle that requires a fair bit of work and a lot of patience.
That is a major tip...
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Old September 3, 2008, 06:58 PM
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nice work sswilson, you took all our knowledge and boiled it down to one post. I guess we won't have to answer any more OC questions.
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Old September 3, 2008, 07:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gooses View Post
Hey, now I am having a problem.. On the motherboard I have set it all the manual so I can overclock and I am trying to change the FSB QDR for my CPU and I set it, I save and exit, it reboots, but then if I go back into the setup the FSB is set to auto again... I cant find away to make it stick!
I'm not familiar with that particular bios, so I can't offer much help (hopefully somebody who has the board will chime in with a suggestion).

Have a look for a setting that allows manual settings on the cpu, turn off any auto-overclocking functions in bios, and don't forget to turn off any power saving features of the cpu.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarJ View Post
nice work sswilson, you took all our knowledge and boiled it down to one post. I guess we won't have to answer any more OC questions.
Heh... That'll never happen. :)

I found when I first started OCing that it was hard to find a very basic description of OCing principals. Hopefully my little blurb helped clear the waters rather than muddy them. :)
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Old September 3, 2008, 07:21 PM
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Yes, that's probably the clearest and most concise version of the basics I've seen. Nicely worded.
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