Go Back   Hardware Canucks > PC BUILDERS & TWEAKERS CORNER > Overclocking, Tweaking and Benchmarking

    
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old July 14, 2008, 10:40 AM
Pike's Avatar
Top Prospect
F@H
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Collingwood, Ontario
Posts: 171

My System Specs

Default Technological Advancements

Maybe this is in the wrong section but I do talk about benchmarking or pushing machines to their limits:

I've been pondering something for the last few weeks that forces me to ask the same question over and over...what the hell do you need something that fast for other than for gaming?

By this I mean, when you benchmark a processor or GPU, you usually do an idle test and a load test. Now, the load test will take for example, a processor to its limits and in a stable configuration. I understand that gaming will also stress a machine to its limits if the settings are set to the limits. But why? How many of us spend more that 1 hour a day actually gaming? (if you do, you need a life IMHO) Is gaming driving this need to have the fastest and the best? Or are manufacturers using gamers as their own benchmarking tools. "Let's see if these people will like cool this or let's see how fast they can make this cpu or gpu or RAM stick go...." Do you think manufacturers are motivated to progress in a certain direction by enthusiasts like us or are they advancing technology as they see it?

I sometime feel that we are nearing a point where these new developments will only be visible through benchmarking and not in the real world applications. I mean, just how fast do you need to open a word document before you can say..."I can't tell if it took 3ms or 2ms". When do you foresee this point when buying a computer will no longer depend on its processor or video speed? What will it depend on? Will software become the bottleneck for computers if it hasn't already. I mean, businesses, designers of all walks of life, and gamers will need better and faster machines but is it the only drive to develop this technology? How does Average Joe fit in? Maybe he'll be the benefactor because technology is so far ahead that he'll have something so fast that it doesn't make a difference in the least. Which brings another question...Will the general population care whether this is the fastest or not or are they just stupid enough to swallow all this tecno-geek stuff as they call it and say....wow, that is cool !!!!

Ok, enough....can't you tell i'm bored at work?
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old July 14, 2008, 11:43 AM
sswilson's Avatar
Moderator
F@H
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Moncton NB
Posts: 14,412

My System Specs

Default

It depends on what you want to do with your computer.

The move to multi-core processors does make a huge difference to the vision of a centralized computer which runs many different apps simultaniously 24/7. Getting those apps to open quickly while everything else is still running in the background does require not only multiple cores, but also cores + memory interfaces which are as fast as possible.

For example.... compare how long it takes for an e-mail to open up on a single core 2.4 P4 system with a single core 3.0 P4 system... can you see a difference? (I can). Now imagine that with E-mail, Instant Messaging, Streaming media content, RSS feeds, etc.... all running at once in the background with the goal being that each app runs seamlessly. Throw in a 4 computer home network all seamlessly interconnected between each other, and whatever external services the IT dudes can think of and all of a sudden it's apparent that more processing power is going to have a huge effect on how "instant on" our computing experience is going to be.
__________________
MSI Z87I Gaming AC / i5 4670K / 2X 4G Gskill 1866 DDR3 / XFX XTR 750 / EVGA GTX 680 SC+ 2GB / Intel DC S3700 200G / random 160G Sata HDD
Inwin 904 / Swiftech MCP655-b / Alphacool NexXxos XT45 120 Rad / 2X Scythe GT AP-15 / EK Supreme HF / Dell UltraSharp U2412M

Asrock AM1H-ITX / AM1 Athlon 5350 / 2X4G Gskill PC3-14900 / Intel 6235 Wi-Fi / 90W Targus Power Brick / 320G Seagate Momentus / Mini-Box M350 / 1X 22" Dell IPS / 1X 22" HP
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old July 14, 2008, 01:41 PM
DK2 DK2 is offline
Allstar
F@H
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: GTA
Posts: 821
Default

These days, just about everything you see and do have a computer behind it.
Now for the at home average Joe, you may be right, gaming is the primary driver.
But beyond that there are data servers, building automation, design and manufacturing, shipping, science, simulation, medical, literally on and on.
A lot of the entertainment industry depends on computer graphics and sound.
Gaming is big, but these other things are too.

Sure games are pretty demanding but Iíve also pushed my PC to limit many times with simulations,
and I have a software validation tool thatíll send it into thermal shutdown if Iím not careful, none of my games will do that.
Right now I want faster CPU, more cores, and more memory.
The video I could live with, just gaming drives that for me.
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old July 14, 2008, 02:02 PM
Pike's Avatar
Top Prospect
F@H
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Collingwood, Ontario
Posts: 171

My System Specs

Default

I'm just wondering whether there will come a time when speed, memory, storage will cease to become the determining factor. For the general sector right now, social networking is big time and business appears to take portability to a new level. I can understand science needing a constant and linear approach to advancements and that's where for the average joe will no longer care what Dell or Gateway, or even Apple has to offer.

Also, aside from all of this....why does someone care if a CPU can get a slight better overclock, or have a GPU give you 125 fps instead of 130, or HD transfer data at 45 or 50 mbps? Am I at a point where, if this stuff works good....who gives a damn if nVidia can give a slight and unoticeable advantage (only on benchmarks)? Maybe it's just getting on my nerves hearing about Intel vs AMD, ATI vs nVidia, WD vs Seagate and the same goes for software.

I guess I'm trying to justify spending another 3 grand on a machine where since I rarely game but use apps like CAD, Adobe CS and MS suites.
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old July 14, 2008, 02:17 PM
sswilson's Avatar
Moderator
F@H
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Moncton NB
Posts: 14,412

My System Specs

Default

You may not see a big difference with the MS suites (although I suspect you would with a large spreadsheet) but I'd imagine you'd see a huge difference with the two other apps you mentioned. Anything which needs to "compile" in the background in order to put pretty pictures on the screen is going to benefit from higher/more efficient clock speeds.

As to why anybody would spend big bucks for 130 vice 125 FPS.... I don't play first person shooters, but for those who do, the extra 5 fps might be enough for them to get a bead on somebody with only 125 FPS.... :)

I do understand where you are coming from though... for the great majority of folks, the industry should be spending a lot more time on stability and inter-operability than they do on increasing clock speeds.

Most folks just want something they can turn on and upgrade without having to spend 2 months researching what to buy.
__________________
MSI Z87I Gaming AC / i5 4670K / 2X 4G Gskill 1866 DDR3 / XFX XTR 750 / EVGA GTX 680 SC+ 2GB / Intel DC S3700 200G / random 160G Sata HDD
Inwin 904 / Swiftech MCP655-b / Alphacool NexXxos XT45 120 Rad / 2X Scythe GT AP-15 / EK Supreme HF / Dell UltraSharp U2412M

Asrock AM1H-ITX / AM1 Athlon 5350 / 2X4G Gskill PC3-14900 / Intel 6235 Wi-Fi / 90W Targus Power Brick / 320G Seagate Momentus / Mini-Box M350 / 1X 22" Dell IPS / 1X 22" HP
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old July 14, 2008, 02:54 PM
Spaceman-Spiff's Avatar
MVP
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: burnaby.bc.ca
Posts: 355
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pike View Post
I sometime feel that we are nearing a point where these new developments will only be visible through benchmarking and not in the real world applications. I mean, just how fast do you need to open a word document before you can say..."I can't tell if it took 3ms or 2ms".
By the time they create hardware that's that fast enough, software makers would create even more demanding software. Microsoft will come up with more bloated and feature rich OS and applications that will slow down the computer.

Try running Windows 98 and Office 98 with your current PC, it will feel really fast. If it runs at all...

I think right now the major bottleneck in loading applications is in the media (HDD, DVD roms). Just look at games from 7-10 years ago. Compared with current games, they load so fast. A lot of PS3 games nowadays load really slow (not during gameplay, but when loading levels or starting up the game itself).
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes