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-   -   $100 vs $300 Motherboard Overclocking (http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/overclocking-tweaking-benchmarking/33075-100-vs-300-motherboard-overclocking.html)

geokilla June 10, 2010 08:59 PM

$100 vs $300 Motherboard Overclocking
 
Is it just me, or have you guys noticed that whether you have a $100 or $300 motherboard, overclocking seems to be similar. Like for example, I usually see that a $100 Gigabyte motherboard could take a Core i7 920 up to 4.2Ghz. The same is achieved by a $300 Gigabyte motherboard. So essentially, that other $200 comes from the quality of parts and features. However, that $200 is supposed to improve overclocking, but in reality it doesn't?

I understand that different chips top out at different frequencies, but rarely do you see a situation where a Core i7 920 hits 3.6Ghz on that $100 Gigabyte motherboard while on the $300 one, it hits 4.2Ghz. Like the gap is minimal, and again you're basically spending money for the features.

Does anyone have that sorta thinking?

0o0 June 10, 2010 09:04 PM

yea. but I also have a feeling that the DOA rate for the $100 board is higher, maybe I'm being paranoid but I've had a few boards and only the cheap ones die. The $300 board is just 'better', as in better quality, better aesthetics, better heatsinks, better materials, better CS, etc. even if the OC is the same, I say there is a difference.

_dangtx_ June 10, 2010 09:15 PM

giga makes decent boards in low end, good and quite good boards on mid and high end.
youd be surprised to see the power filtering 'station' on a 100-120 dollar mobo like the ole ud4p am3. and even their sub 100 dollar(80-85) 785g sports some, albeit without the heatsink.
bios wise, both asus and giga give you a bit of a selection on low end, probably too much on middle and ok on high end

Oversized Rooster June 10, 2010 09:25 PM

I am under the same impression. I've played around with all sorts of mobos from the $75 range to $300 range. Indeed, I've been able to achieve very similar if not identical overclocking results.

Of course the more expensive boards are indeed made with better components but that doesn't mean that cheaper components won't get the same job done. Other times, the extra cost of motherboards is due to additional PCI-E x16 slots (think X58-based and 890-based boards).

I've done some of my best AMD OCing results on cheap $80-100 Gigabyte mobos such as:

MA78GM-US2H
MA785GM-US2H
MA785GMT-UD2H

I've taken Phenom II X4 CPUs to their limits. Most recently, I've started to OC a Phenom II X6 1055T with the old MA78GM-US2H mobo. Works perfectly.

Even for my main rig, I use a mid-range $160 Gigabyte P55A-UD4P mobo. I've been able to achieve the same kind results with my Intel 860 CPU as review sites. Same voltage, frequency, you name it.

Verdict? I absolutely refuse to pay more than $200 for a mobo. I don't care if it's Intel or AMD. :haha: :thumb: It's not that I want to cheap out (I buy quality RAM, PSUs, hard drives, etc) but particularly for the mobo, I fail to see additional value in the $200+ motherboards.

Silvgearx June 10, 2010 10:29 PM

People are pretty much paying for the PCIE lanes.

AmuseMe June 11, 2010 07:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 5ILVgeARX (Post 389822)
People are pretty much paying for the PCIE lanes.

And looks. When was the last time there was a $100 board that looked like the Classified, or the Rampage Extreme (I, II, and III)? Those boards >$300 have no reason whatsoever to look like that either - but I'll buy one based on how it looks :haha:

Rison June 11, 2010 08:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 5ILVgeARX (Post 389822)
People are pretty much paying for the PCIE lanes.

I was about to say this.. ah well.
Price jumps when people want 3-4 16x PCIE slots.. most motherboards have similar components and chipsets - even $100 boards can have usb3 / sata3.
The only other things higher price boards could have is onboard RAID, more sata connections and bells-and-whistles like oc tuner cards, voltage test connections and bigger chipset/vrm heatsinks.

cul8erppl June 11, 2010 09:29 AM

Yeah, with my sub $100 mobo, i was able to unlock my 4th core and take it from 2.6GHz to 3.25GHz. I guess beside the extra PCI-e slots, there's the "extra" cooling on the north & south bridges. You see fancy mobos with heatpipes connecting the two, etc...

geokilla June 11, 2010 01:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 5ILVgeARX (Post 389822)
People are pretty much paying for the PCIE lanes.

I thought the PCI-E lanes depends on what chipset is used. Even comparing motherboards from the same manufacturer using identical chipsets, I guess the difference in price is used to as you all say, more features and improved quality. I'm not sure I agree with the improved CSR support statement though.

Quote:

Originally Posted by AmuseMe (Post 389885)
And looks. When was the last time there was a $100 board that looked like the Classified, or the Rampage Extreme (I, II, and III)? Those boards >$300 have no reason whatsoever to look like that either - but I'll buy one based on how it looks :haha:

Looks matter when it's inside a case? Only reason it'd matter is if you have a side window. Of course, the placement of the PCI-E slots, USB ports, RAM slots, etc. matter but to what extent?

Quote:

Originally Posted by cul8erppl (Post 389942)
Yeah, with my sub $100 mobo, i was able to unlock my 4th core and take it from 2.6GHz to 3.25GHz. I guess beside the extra PCI-e slots, there's the "extra" cooling on the north & south bridges. You see fancy mobos with heatpipes connecting the two, etc...

I find that some heatpipes don't work like they're supposed to, doing a poor job at dissipating heat.

I'm glad to see that I'm not the only one that notices this. Extra money for more features and quality. I'm happy with buying motherboards that cost $80 to $130.

Silvgearx June 11, 2010 04:07 PM

I do not think I can tell you what you seek, but I'll give it a shot.

Most mainstream AMD boards only come with 22 lanes and enthusiast boards come with 38 lanes, and if it gets pair with a NF200 chip you get more lanes and SLI.

Color don't mean jack, its all the same. One of the best things about those ROG/high end board is the clear Cmos on the I/O panel, its the best friend a overclock can have. :haha: (of course for those of people that use cases:haha:)


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