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Old September 6, 2009, 04:15 PM
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Default How do I know when to...? Overclocking help.

I finally got my water cooling set up (CPU and northbridge only) and am wanting to overclock my processor. However, I have been told that sometime the RAM needs to get underclocked. How do I know when to do this?

Last edited by AmuseMe; September 12, 2009 at 10:29 AM.
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Old September 6, 2009, 04:29 PM
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In general, you want to lower the speed of your RAM as much as possible while working on your CPU overclock to prevent the RAM from limiting your FSB speed. The reason for this is because Intel systems benefit much more from higher CPU speeds than they do from higher RAM speeds and lower RAM latencies, so you want to get that as high as possible and then see how high you can take your RAM without having to lower your CPU speed. So basically, the process is as follows:

- Set your RAM to its lowest multiplier in the BIOS
- Overclock your CPU and find its maximum stable speed and settings
- Start overclocking your RAM and see how high you can raise its speed without having to change any CPU settings.
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Old September 6, 2009, 04:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zero82z View Post
In general, you want to lower the speed of your RAM as much as possible while working on your CPU overclock to prevent the RAM from limiting your FSB speed. The reason for this is because Intel systems benefit much more from higher CPU speeds than they do from higher RAM speeds and lower RAM latencies, so you want to get that as high as possible and then see how high you can take your RAM without having to lower your CPU speed. So basically, the process is as follows:

- Set your RAM to its lowest multiplier in the BIOS
- Overclock your CPU and find its maximum stable speed and settings
- Start overclocking your RAM and see how high you can raise its speed without having to change any CPU settings.
How will I know when the RAM is at it highest-stable clock? Will my computer start BSODing?

EDIT: Also, when (if at all) do I start playing with the RAM timings?

Last edited by AmuseMe; September 6, 2009 at 04:58 PM.
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Old September 6, 2009, 04:52 PM
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The best way to stress-test RAM that I've found is with a Prime95 Blend test. If the test errors out or you get a BSOD, the RAM isn't stable.
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Old September 6, 2009, 06:15 PM
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just get memtest and boot from iso
i would never ever look for max ram speed and boot into windows huge chances of corrupting windows

after you boot from iso select test 5 its the fastest test 2 passes
then do a full pass or 2 then boot to windows n run prime for 30 min
i dont beleive running prime more than an hour its bs to me to stress the board and cpu to that point no program stresses it that much
the real test to me is gameplay you can prime for 24 hours n it can crash in game lol so ....
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Old September 6, 2009, 07:42 PM
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somewhere in your bios will be a memory ratio or FSB Ratio setting. Usually it is listed in a "1:1" or "3:2" or "5:3" setting. Other times it may be listed as a mhz rating such as "333:200" or "1000:400" or some such. Basically you want the lowest option for ram speeds. A 1:1 (or mhz rating of the same numbers) means that your RAM will run at the same speeed as your FSB. This, for overclocking, is generally speaking bad. The other ratios are exactly that, FSB:RAM ratios. Usually the FSB is quad pumped mhz and the ram is 'doubled' (hence DoubleDataRate), but it varies how its done on each motherboard. I'm not familiar enough with your Rampage to tell you exactly how its listed.

In any case, flip the settings, and find whatever will clock your ram down from its regular mhz, to the lowest you can. This will eliminate your ram from bottlenecking your CPU overclock. Now you can start raising your FSB to find your max stable CPU overclock. After you find that, you can start fiddling around to figure out the best ratio for your ram.

Good luck!
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Old September 12, 2009, 10:35 AM
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Okay, I FINALLY got my SSD's working thanks to the HWC community (I'm sure some people have notice the terrible luck I have been having :P)
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Old September 12, 2009, 10:44 AM
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well I didn't know any of this ( noob alert) that explains why it is a good idea to buy a faster ram speed to begin with if you plan to over clock. hehe I couldn't figure out why most people here where buying ram at higher speed to me it seemed pointless so I always bout the 6400 ( ddr2 ( 800) well I do plan on overclocking soon and so I guess I better buy some faster ram
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Old September 12, 2009, 03:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shadowmeph View Post
well I didn't know any of this ( noob alert) that explains why it is a good idea to buy a faster ram speed to begin with if you plan to over clock. hehe I couldn't figure out why most people here where buying ram at higher speed to me it seemed pointless so I always bout the 6400 ( ddr2 ( 800) well I do plan on overclocking soon and so I guess I better buy some faster ram
Actually this is something a lot of people think and really is not needed for most part.

I'll give you a e8400 for example.

At stock speeds its FSB speed is 333 (Intel is quad pumped) and if you had say ddr-800 memory that means it runs at 400mhz (ddr2 = double).

So if you were to run your cpu and memory at a 1:1 ratio that means your cpu would have a fsb of 333 as well as your memory which makes your memory become underclocked to 667 speeds not 800.

So now say you wanted to run your e8400 at 3.6ghz which means you'd have to bump your fsb up to 400mhz which now means your memory is running at spec speeds.

Now the part that most people forget is just because memory is rated at say ddr2-800 or ddr2-1066 does not mean that is all it can do. Some ddr2-800 memory can run at speeds of upwards to 900mhz.

So when buying memory and if you think your going to possibly overclock judge what memory you want to buy based off your overclock goals not what others are buying.
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Old September 12, 2009, 05:04 PM
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So i want to set mine to 1.1 ratio , instead of a 1.4 ratio ?
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