Go Back   Hardware Canucks > PC BUILDERS & TWEAKERS CORNER > Overclocking, Tweaking and Benchmarking

    
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11 (permalink)  
Old August 3, 2009, 06:37 PM
MpG's Avatar
MpG MpG is offline
Hall Of Fame
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Kitchener, ON
Posts: 3,136
Default

Dielectric grease can be used in-socket for longer-term use, to make sure there's no pin corrosion. Although I suppose vaseline would work as well. And if you're doing any meaningful level of phase-change, at least some condensation protection is going to be needed around the socket area.

edit: Dielectric grease, not lithium grease. Had home maintenance on the brain
__________________
i7 2600K | ASUS Maximus IV GENE-Z | 580GTX | Corsair DDR3-2133

Last edited by MpG; August 4, 2009 at 05:28 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #12 (permalink)  
Old August 3, 2009, 06:38 PM
Cowboy's Avatar
Hall Of Fame
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Toronto, ON
Posts: 1,375
Default

ok good to know, any suggestions on what to use?
__________________


Reply With Quote
  #13 (permalink)  
Old August 3, 2009, 07:27 PM
MpG's Avatar
MpG MpG is offline
Hall Of Fame
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Kitchener, ON
Posts: 3,136
Default

Nothing that hasn't been said already. What I personally know is from research and second-hand, back when I was looking into heavy-duty pelt's. But in a nutshell, you need to ensure that (moisture-laden) air can't hit any parts of the motherboard (front and back) that are being cooled. The kneaded eraser method is quite popular for its simplicity and remove-ability, although there are other options out there, and some members here with plenty of direct experience. You might consider doing up the board, then snapping some good pics and passing them on for third-party approval.
__________________
i7 2600K | ASUS Maximus IV GENE-Z | 580GTX | Corsair DDR3-2133
Reply With Quote
  #14 (permalink)  
Old August 4, 2009, 08:21 AM
Cowboy's Avatar
Hall Of Fame
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Toronto, ON
Posts: 1,375
Default

found a great resource here thanks for all the help.
__________________


Reply With Quote
  #15 (permalink)  
Old August 4, 2009, 09:26 AM
3oh6's Avatar
Hardware Canucks Reviewer
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Edmonton, AB
Posts: 1,052
Default

that link has some good info but it is also based on the pre-kneaded rubber eraser days. basically, the kneaded rubber eraser eliminates the need for nail polish or conformal coating. i mean, you can put a layer of nail polish or conformal coating down around the CPU socket but it is entirely un-necessary if you insulate well with kneaded eraser and neoprene sheets. but this can also depend on the socket you are insulating. here is my mini-guide since i can't really take photos and have to use what i already have posted as i am not at home.

kneaded rubber eraser doesn't insulate worth crap. it sweats and gets just as cold as the motherboard underneath it. what it does do, however, is prevent any air from touching the motherboard/components and condensing. it can get into the tiniest of spots and can completely protect a motherboard. the best method for applying is to simply work it into the areas around the motherboard. the link earlier to my 975 article explains a bit about my insulation methods but here are some other photos from reviews i have posted...

here i am just starting out with the kneaded rubber eraser:



in this photo you can see the eraser underneath the CPU socket. with i7, it is really easy to insulate underneath the socket hold-down because you can take the hold-down off, fill in the area around the CPU socket, then put the hold down back on squishing the kneaded eraser down as you tighten the torx screws and into every crack a crevice. once you have that down, then you can fill in the rest of the area around the socket. you simply work the kneaded eraser with small chunks into all areas ensuring there are no spaces for air to be trapped.



this is what the motherboard socket should look like when almost down. you can see that there is rubber erase packed into the spaces between the capacitors and inductors so there is absolutely no air pockets. the best way to achieve this is to simply put a small amount of eraser on the cracks and just push it down. once the eraser is level with the top of the capacitor, put another small amount on and keep pushing it down until no more will work itself into the crack. then you know the eraser has replaced all the space around the capacitor and the motherboard. at that point you are ready for the final layer of kneaded eraser to cover all of the caps and to seal around the top of the socket hold-down.

before that though, you can get a good idea of what the kneaded rubber eraser looks like on a good insulation job from this backside photo after i took it off the Classified...



here then is the final kneaded eraser application ready for the next step.



with the mounting hardware pushed through the eraser and packed in around it. the setup is ready for a layer of neoprene. i use half inch thick and it seems to work well with two layers for my phase hold down, but depending on your evaporator and thickness of neoprene, two or three layers may be needed. you want there to be some compression on the neoprene so use as many layers as you need to so that you have to compress the neoprene a little bit when the evaporator is tight. here is a shot of my evap with the insulation is uses. this basically mounts right on the kneaded rubber eraser layer.



for daily use though, i would recommend a layer of the blue shop towel paper towel in-between the kneaded eraser and the neoprene. as i said, the eraser doesn't insulate and it can sweat. the shop towel will absorb any and all of that sweat. you really shouldn't have a sweating issue with a single stage as temps won't be too cold unless it is really humid. as for the back of the board, you want to do the same sort of thing. kneaded rubber eraser to seal off the back side then a layer of neoprene or two on that, then your back plate. i don't have any photos of a setup like that because i don't use a back plate, i use my bench platform which seals the entire backside of the motherboard.

the other thing you might consider, if you are going to be phase cooling for 24/7 use is using dielectric grease in the socket as others have mentioned. vaseline works fine as well. using the insulation methods above i haven't used vaseline in the socket and for the most part always have the phase mounted to the Classified benching daily. i had gone two months without taking the 920 out of the Classified socket once insulated running phase every day and LN2 almost twice a week that entire period. the socket was bone dry with no signs of moisture when i did finally take it out. if you are running socket 775 though, i would recommend it because getting that perfect seal is hard without being able to take the hold-down off.

hope that helps a little bit and feel free for any more specific questions as you move forward. as already mentioned, photos of the insulation as you insulate might not be a bad idea so we can see how it is going and make any recommendations before ever firing up
Reply With Quote
  #16 (permalink)  
Old August 4, 2009, 09:37 AM
Cowboy's Avatar
Hall Of Fame
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Toronto, ON
Posts: 1,375
Default

omg amazing.

I'm looking at going phase 24/7, so that's why I asked.
__________________


Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Enough Cooling? Justin Cider Water Cooling 14 June 26, 2009 03:17 PM
NB Cooling - What would you do? biff Water Cooling 18 April 21, 2008 08:48 AM
NB Cooling.. Infiniti Water Cooling 7 April 15, 2008 06:36 PM
Cooling NB jnliten CPU's and Motherboards 6 March 29, 2008 06:31 PM
How is my cooling? mattydies Water Cooling 6 August 9, 2007 08:12 AM