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  #21 (permalink)  
Old May 20, 2009, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by rjbarker View Post
2. If VDroop "disabled", the vCore entered into BIOS is hardly representative of what your VCore is under load...as it will go up substantially.
I think that's where I'm most confused.
When you say Vdroop disabled... would that be Load-Line Calibration enabled?
If so, then I don't understand what you mean when you say Vcore goes up.
I set 1.33750V in BIOS with LLC enabled... cpuz shows 1.312V idle; 1.296 load.
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Old May 20, 2009, 11:02 AM
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With loadline calibration DISABLED, the voltage you set in bios should be the max the board gives to cpu. Current remains constant in given power states.

With loadline calibration ENABLED, the voltage you set in bios would be consistent from idle/load, depending on how reobust the board's PWM is, and given a bit of Vdrop(difference between settings and actual, sometimes this is a Vraise). Current is varied depending on load state.


When pushing to the limits, ENABLED is the way to go, as this will allow the board the give the cpu all the current it needs, up to the OCP point. The board's PWM will make every effort to ensure that voltage is constant, giving an increase in current when the cpu needs it. You're not gonna get "World-Record"-class clocks any other way.

When running stock, or relaxed clocks, DISABLED is the way to go, as the board will make every effort to keep cpu power consumption within given limits or below them(65w dualcore, 130w quad EE, for example), within load states. Excess current is converted into voltage, in effort to prolong the life of cpu, by minimizing spikes in current ot the cpu.
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Old May 20, 2009, 11:05 AM
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LL Calibration and your Gigabyte Board must behave completely different then an Evga Board and VDroop......here's what I found:

For 202 Bclk x 19 2:8 Memory = 3.83 Ghz Memory 1612 Mhz

"with VDroop" - VCore in BIOS 1.3125v under Full Load drops to around 1.26v
"without VDroop" - VCore in BIOS set to 1.25v under full load increases to around 1.31v

As you can see I could Post my VCore for my stable OC at either 1.26v or 1.25v...which "looks better"...but really isn't representative

I know when I went for a "stable" OC of 4.2 Ghz, I went "without VDroop" vCore at 1.375v, under Full Load I was around 1.44v....I pretty much know that in order to get Prime stable at that OC, with VDroop enabled, I will be looking at vCore in BIOS around 1.45v.
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Old May 20, 2009, 11:37 AM
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LL Calibration and your Gigabyte Board must behave completely different then an Evga Board and VDroop......
That's kinda what I'm thinking.
I have not seen an instance where my Vcore goes above what I set in BIOS... LLC on or off.
I also have not seen my Vcore go up ever under load... it always drops.
Maybe I'll run some longer tests, but I don't know how useful that would be without proper equipment to measure voltages.
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Old May 20, 2009, 11:41 AM
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Go back and read (very carefully) Cadavecas Post, he explains the LL Calibration for your Board very well, considering its Electronic Engineering language.
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Old May 20, 2009, 11:46 AM
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Old May 20, 2009, 02:58 PM
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What I posted is still true with load line calibration(LLC on = VDroop off), the "spike" rise of voltage is just too fast for software to record it.

HOWEVER, what cadaveca said is also true, for world record, and balls to the wall OC's, you want VDroop off/LLC on. In cases like this, chances are your not too worryabout the hardware's *prolonged* life.

VDroop off/LLC on is more stressful on the hardware, both your CPU AND your MB, but I must stress, it hasn't been proven to cause instability/early death, one way or the other.

VDroop on/LLC off is good m'kay, its less stressful for the CPU/MB VRM's. Most home user OC's do not require it. Why put extra stress on the system, when you can be cruising along at the exact same speeds without it.
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Old May 20, 2009, 06:36 PM
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I appreciate all the input.
At the moment I have Load-Line Calibration disabled, but we'll see where things go.
I'm only at 3.8GHz, and I do need this setup to last me a couple years...
If I really don't need LLC, and leaving it disabled really will ease hardware stress then I may as well leave it disabled.
However, since I haven't heard of any cases where the feature has killed hardware I'm really not to worried either way.
Oh well... LLC or no LLC I'm having fun.
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