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  #31 (permalink)  
Old November 20, 2013, 08:18 AM
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Originally Posted by JohnWayne View Post
That's a great idea yama. Getting a dedicated HDD is a good option for people who don't have a spare pc. Those slide out hd trays are also quite inexpensive and one could switch OSes without having to open the case.
It can also be a royal pain in the ass. While your experimenting virtualization is the best way and quickest. Its no different than using a dedicated hard drive but with less hassle.

Don't like the OS .. nuke and try another. I once had like 20 VMs going with different distros.
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  #32 (permalink)  
Old November 20, 2013, 08:53 AM
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ya VMs are a good start then once you find something you think you like then you install it on your system that is when the funs starts for some people it is not fun but others like myself I like playing around.
I think today I am going to try and fix my Opensuse on my other PC and play around with that and evben try some of the newer games that apparently work with linux now . I think PC are the greatest thing if I didn't have the ones I have I am not sure what I would be doing or what kind of trouble I would get myself in with my spare time .
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  #33 (permalink)  
Old November 23, 2013, 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by enaberif View Post
It can also be a royal pain in the ass. While your experimenting virtualization is the best way and quickest. Its no different than using a dedicated hard drive but with less hassle.

Don't like the OS .. nuke and try another. I once had like 20 VMs going with different distros.
No doubt, using VM's is a no brainer when learning something new. Much easier with linux as the VM will take care of a lot of the basic little things (internet access for example.)
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  #34 (permalink)  
Old November 23, 2013, 05:11 PM
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No doubt, using VM's is a no brainer when learning something new. Much easier with linux as the VM will take care of a lot of the basic little things (internet access for example.)
These days network asccess shouldn't be a problem with Linux. Its generally either Intel or Realtek controller.
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  #35 (permalink)  
Old November 23, 2013, 09:52 PM
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These days network asccess shouldn't be a problem with Linux. Its generally either Intel or Realtek controller.
I'm referring to enabling the internet adapter - I haven't installed Ubuntu on a machine lately but something like CentOS can take some configuring on the basics. Not difficult but perhaps confusing to someone not familiar, thus a VM will take care of this for them.
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  #36 (permalink)  
Old November 23, 2013, 09:55 PM
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I'm referring to enabling the internet adapter - I haven't installed Ubuntu on a machine lately but something like CentOS can take some configuring on the basics. Not difficult but perhaps confusing to someone not familiar, thus a VM will take care of this for them.
Uhm.. Any current distribution uses modules for the kernel and will scan your hardware and load anything appropriate even Ubuntu does this; enabling is done on boot now like any other OS.

If you are running a Linux or Unix distribution which does not have networking enabled out of the box its a failed OS from the start.
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  #37 (permalink)  
Old November 24, 2013, 08:43 PM
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Originally Posted by enaberif View Post
Uhm.. Any current distribution uses modules for the kernel and will scan your hardware and load anything appropriate even Ubuntu does this; enabling is done on boot now like any other OS.

If you are running a Linux or Unix distribution which does not have networking enabled out of the box its a failed OS from the start.
Uhm... "Failed OS?"

Get your head out of your ass -- Play with some more linux Distros and you will find that not all will spoon feed you like Windows or Ubuntu (Bloated OS's).
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  #38 (permalink)  
Old November 24, 2013, 09:08 PM
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Uhm... "Failed OS?"

Get your head out of your ass -- Play with some more linux Distros and you will find that not all will spoon feed you like Windows or Ubuntu (Bloated OS's).
Debian, CentOS, Slackware, Gentoo, Mint, Redhat, Ubuntu and Fedora plus many other small name ones like Puppy and so forth and guess what they ALL get networking right from the get go.
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  #39 (permalink)  
Old November 25, 2013, 12:51 PM
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Debian, CentOS, Slackware, Gentoo, Mint, Redhat, Ubuntu and Fedora plus many other small name ones like Puppy and so forth and guess what they ALL get networking right from the get go.
I have to assume you are still refering to installing the above mentioned OS's on a VM.

If you are trying to state that "NO" the above mentioned OS's will all start up with Networking enabled from the start on any Physical Machine -- You are WRONG.
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  #40 (permalink)  
Old November 25, 2013, 01:11 PM
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I have to assume you are still refering to installing the above mentioned OS's on a VM.

If you are trying to state that "NO" the above mentioned OS's will all start up with Networking enabled from the start on any Physical Machine -- You are WRONG.
I am not talking about a VM I am talking physical. Name one of those that does not have network out of the box working?
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