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  #21 (permalink)  
Old November 16, 2013, 09:06 PM
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I would suggest reading up on RHEL vs Debian. I don't mind Debian Distros (Ubuntu) but my personal preference is RHEL (Redhat/Centos).

Ubuntu for example while "user friendly" is starting to get so bloated it reminds me of Windows. A little handicapped too as far as Linux Distros go.

Centos (my usual distro) is lightweight and powerful with lots of support and repositories.

Too learn linux quickly, you will need to abandon the GUI as much as possible and learn to navigate via CLI.
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Old November 16, 2013, 09:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Quicken View Post
I would suggest reading up on RHEL vs Debian. I don't mind Debian Distros (Ubuntu) but my personal preference is RHEL (Redhat/Centos).

Ubuntu for example while "user friendly" is starting to get so bloated it reminds me of Windows. A little handicapped too as far as Linux Distros go.

Centos (my usual distro) is lightweight and powerful with lots of support and repositories.

Too learn linux quickly, you will need to abandon the GUI as much as possible and learn to navigate via CLI.
You have people who prefer Slackware/Debian style or Redhat/CentOS distros. You also have Gentoo people and FreeBSD people.

It comes down to personal preference but I have been dabbling int he *nix universe before it was even cool and that would have been back in 95-96 and I learned at that point it was MUCH easier to learn Slackware/Debian than it was to learn Redhat.
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old November 16, 2013, 10:10 PM
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Originally Posted by enaberif View Post
You have people who prefer Slackware/Debian style or Redhat/CentOS distros. You also have Gentoo people and FreeBSD people.

It comes down to personal preference but I have been dabbling int he *nix universe before it was even cool and that would have been back in 95-96 and I learned at that point it was MUCH easier to learn Slackware/Debian than it was to learn Redhat.
I don't disagree, simply I believe the "payoff" is more rewarding with Red hat. I feel compelled to admit I have had formal training though.
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  #24 (permalink)  
Old November 16, 2013, 10:24 PM
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I don't disagree, simply I believe the "payoff" is more rewarding with Red hat. I feel compelled to admit I have had formal training though.
How is the payoff more rewarding?
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Old November 17, 2013, 03:25 AM
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How is the payoff more rewarding?
Once again, this boils down to user preference. I feel it's more "rewarding" when/if you start to focus on Enterprise level application, Servers. CentOS/Redhat can be used as simple desktop OS or a large scale server. I'm the type of personality that's always growing and it's nice when your "tools" are scalable as well.

Linky to a SpiceWorks thread on this subject if your interested.

What free Linux distro would you use for servers? - Spiceworks
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  #26 (permalink)  
Old November 17, 2013, 08:35 AM
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Lots of people and companies use a debian variation for a server. It's just as capable as any redhat one is as well
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Old November 19, 2013, 09:59 AM
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My first word of advice is to put linux on a separate machine or in a VM if you're just starting out. So when you have issues you can google for answers on a working machine. Grub or Lilo will probably break at some point and you won't be stuck with a temporary paper weight until you figure out how to fix it. The thing to remember is Linux is Linux. They're all just managed a little differently.

To the OP, I'd say try installing Ubuntu Server LTS. You'll learn how to install the latest graphics drivers from scripts, add your windows managers and disable server processes, deal with boot managers, learn how apt works. Sticking with Ubuntu to start gives you a solid community that's use to dealing with noobs. A lot of the issues are already documented step by step if you get into trouble.

Once you know how to fix things like Xorg, Grub and your GPU driver then you can try something a little more cutting edge like Fedora or compile programs from source into your working Ubuntu System.
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Old November 19, 2013, 12:42 PM
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it is all personal preference I didn't like redhat or Ubuntu I seemed to always mess it with those versions of Linux not sure why that was but I did, I used to love Openbsuse but I just messed up one of those also lol
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old November 19, 2013, 04:28 PM
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I started my adventure by enrolling in a online Linux course about 11 years ago and needed to buy a big a$$ linux bible ... man those were the days, up every night until 2 - 3 in the morning. I eventually switched completely from windows for my work running SuSE 8.2 in the days before openSuSe. All was going great until one day, the screen saver kicked in and the computer never recovered ... lost everything. My hardware knowledge was not what it is today and so today the outcome might have been different. I managed to bring the hardware back to life but decided I was not ready for prime time and kept dabbling for years and ended up installing and using Mint 5 XFCE which is still running BTW. I just booted it up after it sat for 3 years in storage.

My advise, keep at it ... there may be a side benefit were you don't keep building machines you don't need while you are concentrated on it Most linux forums are a good source of information as well.

I always found that installing a distro on a separate hdd is the way to go and use the boot menu from the motherboard to select which device to boot from or use use a system to play around with dedicated to it.

BTW typing this using Mint 15 XFCE
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old November 20, 2013, 09:11 AM
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That's a great idea yama. Getting a dedicated HDD is a good option for people who don't have a spare pc. Those slide out hd trays are also quite inexpensive and one could switch OSes without having to open the case.
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