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Socrates_Johnston May 4, 2011 07:39 AM

microsoft technet
 
hello all

I am trying to get a small business rolling, and need to purchase a couple m$oft licenses (office, win7, etc...). From what I understand, technet is a yearly subscription that gives you 10 licenses of each version of win7, licenses of office, and some other microsoft products... but what is the catch? can any company purchase a technet subscription? what happens to the licenses taken from technet after the subscription expires?

thanks.

sswilson May 4, 2011 08:27 AM

Technet codes are only to be used for testing and using them to outfit your business machines for day to day use would be a clear violation of the technet subscription. (Unlike home use for enthusiasts which is a bit more gray..... ;) ).

JD May 4, 2011 03:44 PM

To do it properly, you need to purchase Volume License keys for the software. I think you need to either go through MS directly, or an authorized re-seller.

Most small businesses (that are technically savvy) would lean towards open-source software I'd say. At least that's free to use.

However if you're <10 users and aren't using a server or anything, then I'd say just buy normal licenses. Although still not technically legal, it's more legal than using a TechNet subscription IMO.

SugarJ May 4, 2011 03:52 PM

Unless you are running software that requires windows, Ubuntu and it's related distributions all run LibreOffice, which does everything MS Office does for free. I'm very close to switching my whole office over after repeated stupidity getting viruses on company machines.

sswilson May 4, 2011 04:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JD (Post 512071)
To do it properly, you need to purchase Volume License keys for the software. I think you need to either go through MS directly, or an authorized re-seller.

Most small businesses (that are technically savvy) would lean towards open-source software I'd say. At least that's free to use.

However if you're <10 users and aren't using a server or anything, then I'd say just buy normal licenses. Although still not technically legal, it's more legal than using a TechNet subscription IMO.

Are you suggesting that any business requires a "special" license of MS software? I don't believe this is so, and while a business would not be permitted to use something like the 3 user "student" version of office, I'm pretty sure the regular (including OEM) license is completely within EULA for business use.

JD May 4, 2011 06:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sswilson (Post 512084)
Are you suggesting that any business requires a "special" license of MS software? I don't believe this is so, and while a business would not be permitted to use something like the 3 user "student" version of office, I'm pretty sure the regular (including OEM) license is completely within EULA for business use.

I figure OEM/Retail keys are mainly for home use only. It's cost prohibitive anyhow to use it in corporations. Also typically speaking, with proper corporate licensing, you get much better support from MS should anything go wrong.

For a small business, assuming just simple applications, I'd probably consider running Small Business Server which would give you your Active Directory, GPOs, Exchange, etc. Assuming it's not totally cut down, it should also support Remote Apps, or look into Citrix and Wyse. Then just buy a bunch of thin clients (or build your own budget Atoms/AMDs) and run the new Windows 7 Thin PC (or prior Windows Embedded).

This way all the apps would be on the server and less chances of viruses and stuff assuming you kill off Internet access or seriously lock down the clients via GPO. Easier from a management standpoint too.

I know the whole mainframe w/ dumb terminals is such an old concept, but it's quite an efficient one and picking up ground once again as technology has improved vastly. You can easily run Office over RDP on a 100Mbps LAN connection, and even better on 1Gbps, assuming the server is capable. Theoretically, you'd never have to upgrade client hardware, only server hardware.

CoolHandL January 6, 2012 03:10 PM

Back from the DEAD!!!!!

Im an IT professional/ Enthusiast who wants to test / evaluate MS OS's and software suites, I have 5 (this number is growing) PC's and a Laptop. Everywhere I've read its ok for me to test in a home Network with a Subscription.
10 Licenses per os /software suite and 10 activations per license. after my year subscription i can indefinitely test / evaluate till i feel the need to renew and upgrade. after the sub expires i will not be able to download any new software iso's etc.. but still be able to use my keys? just wanted to confirm this thanks.

My sources:
Is Microsoft Technet ok to use for my family PC's? - Microsoft Help | DSLReports Forums

TechNet "is" ok for use on home computers - Windows 7 Forums

sswilson January 6, 2012 03:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CoolHandL (Post 587427)
Back from the DEAD!!!!!

Im an IT professional/ Enthusiast who wants to test / evaluate MS OS's and software suites, I have 5 (this number is growing) PC's and a Laptop. Everywhere I've read its ok for me to test in a home Network with a Subscription.
10 Licenses per os /software suite and 10 activations per license. after my year subscription i can indefinitely test / evaluate till i feel the need to renew and upgrade. after the sub expires i will not be able to download any new software iso's etc.. but still be able to use my keys? just wanted to confirm this thanks.

My sources:
Is Microsoft Technet ok to use for my family PC's? - Microsoft Help | DSLReports Forums

TechNet "is" ok for use on home computers - Windows 7 Forums


Short answer is yes, your keys for most software will still be valid after your subscription expires, however it's no longer 10 keys (it's 5 now), and most of the higher end enterprise software has a corporate install key which does expire.

edit.... just renewed my sub last night..... ;)

3.0charlie January 6, 2012 03:21 PM

Indeed, but I can confirm that I have used my Server 2008R2 Enterprise key on my 4p rig after my subscription expired, and the activation was successful.

sswilson January 6, 2012 03:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 3.0charlie (Post 587433)
Indeed, but I can confirm that I have used my Server 2008R2 Enterprise key on my 4p rig after my subscription expired, and the activation was successful.


Cool! That's good to know.

Quite frankly, I don't use my sub for much other than for quasi-legit OS's in whatever flavour I feel like at the time (win 7 starter ran pretty well on a single core atommmm ;) ) for whatever hardware I happen to be running, but IMO, $250 / year is a fair tradeoff for virtually unlimited personal access to MS's full library.


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