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LordHood2 January 5, 2013 11:48 PM

Small Personal Server Build
 
Hey guys, whats up?

Just finished part-picking for a rather ambitious home server project. I haven't really shown this to anybody as of yet, and I just want to make sure i'm not making any blatant mistakes, or am spending too much on something. My planned budget for this build is around $300-350, currently I'm at $315. The server doesn't have to do much, but there are a couple of things it has to do:

- File Server (duh)
- Personal Web/Email server <-- webserver portion for developmental purposes, no public hosting is planned

And these are optional purposes:
- run one VM desktop, nothing big or complicated, maybe a second install of linux not sure on this one
- Dedicated SETI@Home node (BECAUSE I ALIENS EXIST!)
- Dedicated server host for certain games, probably LAN only. I dont plan on opening this up to public access

And now for the all important hardware:

Chassis: ARK ITX/CS-Ci02 (PSU built in)
Mobo: Foxconn H61S LGA 1155 Mini ITX
CPU: Intel Celeron g530 2.4ghz Dualcore CPU
RAM: 2GB Kingston DDR3 1333mhz Unbuffered Server Memory(upgrading to 4/8gb, once i finalize other hardware)
HDD: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 7200RPM HDD
Network: SYBA 10/100/1000mbs dual-port gigabit NIC

And here is some other almost required hardware:
TP-LINK 10/100/1000mbps Unmanaged Gigabit Switch

I picked the case because A: It was cheap, and B: had a PSU built in, which means less money. I might search around for a different case/psu option, but for now thats the one I'm sticking with. The Mobo/CPU were also largely picked because of price. I could have gone AMD for a slightly more feature rich board, but the cheapest CPU for said board was $55, way too much for me atm. The Celeron i picked wasn't much cheaper, but when combined with the mobo was about $50 cheaper then the AMD solution. The dual gigabit NIC may seem like an odd choice, considering the motherboard has a built in port, but any server needs at least two ports if you want to do more then look at it in my book. Used Newegg to part search for everything by the way.


Just curious on how this looks to other who have more experience building small personal servers. Something I would like but haven't been able to achieve on the budget is esata ports, since I have a 3TB external raid enclosure that interfaces via esata. The only boards I have found that on have been matx, not mitx. So, yeah. There's that. Tell me what you guys think!

BlueByte January 6, 2013 08:54 AM

That's an ambitious build for what you want to do for the budget. I work with vms all the time, you will want to build with a few things in the back of your head.

-ideally you should not share could cores if you can help it. But it can be done if you have to.
-avoid at all costs memory swapping, it is just painful dont do it.
-if you need two nics get a desktop Intel chip one, they are $30. I would not trust a syba card for anything.

In this case I would say budget + vm = amd 4 core over a celeron, and find some more cheap memory vs paying for server memory. Figure out your vm situation before buying anything, if it's to much for this build your celeron and memory are fine as a home server.

frontier204 January 6, 2013 09:51 AM

ARK | Intel® Celeron® Processor G530 (2M Cache, 2.40 GHz)
In their lower-end CPUs, Intel cripples a bunch of instruction set support, including some VM capabilities.

I wouldn't trust that case/PSU combo unless you can find a GOOD review on that PSU to say that it won't blow up.

Unless the 2GB RAM stick is free, just pull a stick of RAM out of your main rig that you have in "my system specs" instead of wasting $10-15 or so on the RAM. When you save up for / obtain the 4 or 8GB, then put the RAM back into your main rig. I'm not sure about SETI, but Rosetta and GPUGrid tasks on BOINC eat enough RAM to make it that you can't share a VM and the crunching on 2GB.

Here's some ideas using the outgoing AMD FM1 platform:
Newegg.ca - COOLER MASTER Elite 311 RC-311B-SWN1 Silver Steel / Plastic ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
Newegg.ca - MSI A55M-P33 FM1 AMD A55 (Hudson D2) Micro ATX AMD Motherboard with UEFI BIOS
Newegg.ca - Intel EXPI9301CTBLK Network Adapter 10/ 100/ 1000Mbps PCI-Express 1 x RJ45 (use with onboard or buy 2 of them)
Newegg.ca - Antec EarthWatts Green EA-380D Green 380W Continuous power ATX12V v2.3 / EPS12V 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply
Newegg.ca - AMD A4-3300 Llano 2.5GHz Socket FM1 65W Dual-Core Desktop APU (CPU + GPU) with DirectX 11 Graphic AMD Radeon HD 6410D AD3300OJHXBOX
Newegg.ca - Nippon Labs eSATA Bracket Two SATA II internal cable to 2 port ESATA bracket for SATA I and SATA II Hard Drive Model ESATAB-2P

LordHood2 January 6, 2013 04:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frontier204 (Post 682520)
ARK | Intel® Celeron® Processor G530 (2M Cache, 2.40 GHz)
In their lower-end CPUs, Intel cripples a bunch of instruction set support, including some VM capabilities.

I wouldn't trust that case/PSU combo unless you can find a GOOD review on that PSU to say that it won't blow up.

Unless the 2GB RAM stick is free, just pull a stick of RAM out of your main rig that you have in "my system specs" instead of wasting $10-15 or so on the RAM. When you save up for / obtain the 4 or 8GB, then put the RAM back into your main rig. I'm not sure about SETI, but Rosetta and GPUGrid tasks on BOINC eat enough RAM to make it that you can't share a VM and the crunching on 2GB.

Here's some ideas using the outgoing AMD FM1 platform:
Newegg.ca - COOLER MASTER Elite 311 RC-311B-SWN1 Silver Steel / Plastic ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
Newegg.ca - MSI A55M-P33 FM1 AMD A55 (Hudson D2) Micro ATX AMD Motherboard with UEFI BIOS
Newegg.ca - Intel EXPI9301CTBLK Network Adapter 10/ 100/ 1000Mbps PCI-Express 1 x RJ45 (use with onboard or buy 2 of them)
Newegg.ca - Antec EarthWatts Green EA-380D Green 380W Continuous power ATX12V v2.3 / EPS12V 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply
Newegg.ca - AMD A4-3300 Llano 2.5GHz Socket FM1 65W Dual-Core Desktop APU (CPU + GPU) with DirectX 11 Graphic AMD Radeon HD 6410D AD3300OJHXBOX
Newegg.ca - Nippon Labs eSATA Bracket Two SATA II internal cable to 2 port ESATA bracket for SATA I and SATA II Hard Drive Model ESATAB-2P


Thanks for the input here. That is why I came to this forum. The only thing I disagree with is swapping memory out of my current build. I run VMPlayer frequently on my main rig, so I can't afford to be taking memory out of it. Even if I didn't run VMs, I wouldn't want to take a stick of memory out anyways. That aside, I've scrapped most of the other hardware I has posted, as yours' seems more thought out. I can't say I wouldn't have ended up with something similar ever, but it looks better. Thanks

Mena January 6, 2013 05:26 PM

What OS you plan on running?

LordHood2 January 6, 2013 05:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mena (Post 682635)
What OS you plan on running?


Ubuntu server. For sure. Unless I come across a reason to use something else, Linux is the operator of choice.

LordHood2 January 6, 2013 06:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BlueByte (Post 682504)
That's an ambitious build for what you want to do for the budget. I work with vms all the time, you will want to build with a few things in the back of your head.

-ideally you should not share could cores if you can help it. But it can be done if you have to.
-avoid at all costs memory swapping, it is just painful dont do it.
-if you need two nics get a desktop Intel chip one, they are $30. I would not trust a syba card for anything.

In this case I would say budget + vm = amd 4 core over a celeron, and find some more cheap memory vs paying for server memory. Figure out your vm situation before buying anything, if it's to much for this build your celeron and memory are fine as a home server.

Running VMs would be a side benefit if it could be done with the final hardware. If it cant be done, I'll just pay for a memory upgrade to my main rig and and be satisfied. I have also (with a slight influence fomr a post or two above this) made some changes to the hardware, and gone with an intel nic. I read about SYBA, and they suck. Enough said. I picked that one because it was cheap + dual port. And after thinking about it, once the server is connected to a switch, I dont need more then two Gbit ports. Only reason i have two is because every other machine/device other then my main rig will connect to the server thru the switch.


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