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-   -   Logical Increments PC Buying Guide (http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/new-builds/42300-logical-increments-pc-buying-guide.html)

Iceman April 6, 2011 06:47 AM

Logical Increments PC Buying Guide
 
Here's a pretty up-to-date buying guide for those planning on building a new PC. I think it was originally posted on 4Chan. Logical Increments - PC Buying Guide
Created April 5th, 2011.

*Edit* Mods might want to move this to the New Builds Forum.

Arinoth April 6, 2011 07:06 AM

Moved to New Builds as per OP Request.

Personally i don't agree with some of the parts mentioned but we all have our preferences for motherboards, processors, etc for different price brackets

draemn April 6, 2011 07:40 AM

Interesting idea, but it really misses the mark imo... Whoever wrote this made it very mis-leading for beginners... Sure, he breaks down all the bits and bytes down below, but the final price categories and the ratings of how 'powerful' it is really don't tell you a good picture of what reality is like. Oh well, it's one of those things where someone tires to be helpful and then puts in a whole bunch of warnings about when it won't be helpful and hopes the reader actually reads everything and uses their own brain to interpret this chart.

dma0991 April 6, 2011 08:17 AM

This is really a good guide for really new beginners but usually I would follow depending on the user's requirements. For example if the user does not OC but does use software that uses a lot of threads then the Core i7 2600 would be good but in that particular list I couldn't even find a Core i5 2500 or a Core i7 2600 in that list.

The lower segment SB processors below the Core i5 2500K are not listed as well and they still outperform AMD's current offerings. As always with list like this the specs are rigid and no flexibility of customization. But there is a disclaimer stated that research should be made so I guess that this is still a good list that is compiled. Thumbs up to the person who took the time and trouble to at least give a basic guide to beginners. :thumb:

Iceman April 6, 2011 10:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Arinoth (Post 503501)
Moved to New Builds as per OP Request.

Personally i don't agree with some of the parts mentioned but we all have our preferences for motherboards, processors, etc for different price brackets

Agreed. I think the main thing is that while the builds might not be 100% "optimal", they're not "wrong". I.E. You wouldn't be disappointed with any of those choices.

Quote:

Sure, he breaks down all the bits and bytes down below, but the final price categories and the ratings of how 'powerful' it is really don't tell you a good picture of what reality is like.
True, but it would be next to impossible to have performance figures for everything, hence the research is still required disclaimer. The only thing that the chart claims is that each step down the ladder will result in more performance than the previous step. Where the chart is really useful is if you have a set budget, it will give you a starting point for your research.

Quote:

For example if the user does not OC but does use software that uses a lot of threads then the Core i7 2600 would be good but in that particular list I couldn't even find a Core i5 2500 or a Core i7 2600 in that list.
Agreed, it would be nice to include the 2500 and 2600, but again you really can't have every option on one chart without confusing beginners.

Another use for the chart is that if you're looking for a better video card, or faster processor, you can just make your way down the column and then do a little more research on those more powerful models (remembering to match processors with compatible motherboards of course). I think that would be pretty useful for beginners or people who have been out of the hardware loop for a while.

Bond007 April 6, 2011 10:19 AM

Its a start for people who have no idea what they are doing, but it doesn't take into account if its a gaming rig, general use, video editing, etc. That said its still useful for those that need help and don't go on a forum like this for assistance.

enaberif April 6, 2011 10:26 AM

If your looking at buying a 2500 and a 2600 and not the K version then if you want the 2600 you might as well buy the 2500K and overclock it and get good performance and save money.

Iceman April 6, 2011 03:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bond007 (Post 503538)
Its a start for people who have no idea what they are doing, but it doesn't take into account if its a gaming rig, general use, video editing, etc.

Judging by the video cards, I would say that they're all gaming rigs, not counting the first 2.

Logical Increments February 6, 2013 04:10 PM

Sorry to necro this thread, but it still shows up on the first page of Google results for "Logical Increments."

If a mod could update the link in the OP to be our fancy new site that's updated much more frequently, that would be awesome: Logical Increments - PC Buying Guide

Thanks!


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