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Old December 22, 2008, 12:29 PM
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Default Basic questions for a 4870 rig

All questions answered

Thx for the help everyone :D

Last edited by Bucklaz; December 24, 2008 at 08:23 AM.
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Old December 22, 2008, 12:55 PM
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I would suggest Gigabyte GA-EP43-DS3L motherboard as the SATA connectors won't be covered up by the graphics card and I think it is pretty cheap priced board for intel E5200 but you could wait until after the new year when prices will start to drop due to AMD Phenom II coming out.

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Old December 22, 2008, 12:58 PM
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I have a E3110@4 ghz/4870/2 hdd/1 dvd/2 hsf/3 case fan/2x2gb ram and it rarely draws more than 300 watts. I think you could get away with a 450. Calculate here.

http://http://web.aanet.com.au/SnooP/psucalc.php

Also here is a quote from wikipedia:

"Computer power supplies are generally about 7075% efficient.[2] That means in order for a 75% efficient power supply to produce 75 W of DC output it would require 100 W of AC input and dissipate the remaining 25 W in heat. Higher-quality power supplies can be over 80% efficient; higher energy efficiency waste less energy in heat, and requires less power to cool as a result. As of 2007, 93%-efficient power supplies are available.[3]
It's important to match the capacity of a power supply to the power needs of the computer. The energy efficiency of power supplies drops significantly at low loads. Efficiency generally peaks at about 50-75% load. The curve varies from model to model (for examples of how this curve looks see the test reports of energy efficient models found on the 80 PLUS website). One rule of thumb is that a power supply that's over twice the required size will be significantly less efficient, and waste a lot of electricity."
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Last edited by stoanee; December 22, 2008 at 01:05 PM.
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Old December 22, 2008, 01:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paphman910 View Post
I would suggest Gigabyte GA-EP43-DS3L motherboard as the SATA connectors won't be covered up by the graphics card and I think it is pretty cheap priced board for intel E5200 but you could wait until after the new year when prices will start to drop due to AMD Phenom II coming out.

Paphman910
Oh man, I was waiting all this time until boxing day. I think I might just bite on boxingday, since i've already got the card




Quote:
Originally Posted by stoanee View Post
I have a E3110@4 ghz/4870/2 hdd/1 dvd/2 hsf/3 case fan/2x2gb ram and it rarely draws more than 300 watts. i think you could get away with a 450. Calculate here.http://http://web.aanet.com.au/SnooP/psucalc.php
Also here is a quote from wikipedia:
"Computer power supplies are generally about 7075% efficient.[2] That means in order for a 75% efficient power supply to produce 75 W of DC output it would require 100 W of AC input and dissipate the remaining 25 W in heat. Higher-quality power supplies can be over 80% efficient; higher energy efficiency waste less energy in heat, and requires less power to cool as a result. As of 2007, 93%-efficient power supplies are available.[3]
It's important to match the capacity of a power supply to the power needs of the computer. The energy efficiency of power supplies drops significantly at low loads. Efficiency generally peaks at about 50-75% load. The curve varies from model to model (for examples of how this curve looks see the test reports of energy efficient models found on the 80 PLUS website). One rule of thumb is that a power supply that's over twice the required size will be significantly less efficient, and waste a lot of electricity."
Seriously? jebus, why in the heck would diamond reccomend a 500-700w psu. probably compensation for the market of lower efficiency psu's i suppose.
Also, thank you for the site. I'll check it out right now :)

edit: just checked the site. so the 450vx is 83% that should be plenty for my needs :D So I should mainly be looking at the wattage after efficiency. In the 450vx's case its usable wattage would be 360w right?
This is a neat lil site. Thx again

Last edited by Bucklaz; December 22, 2008 at 01:09 PM.
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Old December 22, 2008, 01:56 PM
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Nope. Sorry. A PSU's rating is its output rating. So a 450w PSU will put out 450w to the system, but draw more from the wall (like 562w if it's an 80% efficient PSU).
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Old December 22, 2008, 02:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarJ View Post
Nope. Sorry. A PSU's rating is its output rating. So a 450w PSU will put out 450w to the system, but draw more from the wall (like 562w if it's an 80% efficient PSU).
ooh ok, gotcha
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Old December 22, 2008, 07:25 PM
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If you're broke, then why the hell would you get a 4870? There's no point in getting one if you're not gonna spend like $600 on the other parts of your PC. Your other components, such as the CPU will bottleneck the 4870 unless you overclock say, a E7200 to at least 3.6Ghz.

Assuming by broke you mean you're only gonna spend $300 on your PC, I say go with a AMD dual core rig. Those will serve you well for a budget system.
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Old December 22, 2008, 10:45 PM
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Originally Posted by geokilla View Post
If you're broke, then why the hell would you get a 4870? There's no point in getting one if you're not gonna spend like $600 on the other parts of your PC. Your other components, such as the CPU will bottleneck the 4870 unless you overclock say, a E7200 to at least 3.6Ghz.

Assuming by broke you mean you're only gonna spend $300 on your PC, I say go with a AMD dual core rig. Those will serve you well for a budget system.

thx for the reply. So I'd need atleast an E7200 oc'd to 3.6 to not bottleneck the card?

that's nuts. so there is no stock processor out right now that can allow a 4870 to run unhinderered?
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Old December 23, 2008, 03:45 PM
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i believe most e5200 can reach 3.6ghz
why not get the e5200 and put a little more for a good overclockable board.
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Old December 23, 2008, 07:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 5ILVgeARX View Post
i believe most e5200 can reach 3.6ghz
why not get the e5200 and put a little more for a good overclockable board.
LOL funny that you said that. Cuz I changed the board for a better oc board, a p43. But I also changed the psu to a 400w psu, I think that will probably limit me now haha.
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