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Old November 7, 2011, 09:11 AM
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I think if you get a licensed network installer, rather than having an electrician do it, it'll be done better. I'm sure it'll work either way, it's just if you want quality or not. I think in most cases, electricians will just pull the Ethernet through with the electrical wiring, usually resulting in it getting all tangled up.

I think electrical wiring is typically overhead, but it can be buried as well. Depends on the area I suppose. And if the laneway house is being wired in (electrically) to the main house, or if it's going to have its own meter and thus a direct connection to the power companies main feeds. Something the builder/contractor should know what's right.

And yes, PVC should be fine as long as it's below the frost line. PVC/ABS tubing is used for your main sewer line to the city as well, at least in newer homes. You could also use "outdoor" cabling as well, like this: Outdoor CAT 6 Cable, Outdoor CAT5e Cable, Shielded Outdoor CAT 5e Cable, Direct Bury CAT5e cable, Aerial CAT5e Cable, loose tube cable, Toneable duct, armored fiber optic cables just to be even safer should the PVC conduit crack.

I'm assuming you'll have multiple jacks in the laneway house too which is why I suggested installing a switch/patch panel in there too. It'll also cut down on running multiple cables back to the main house and possibly exceeding distance limits of Ethernet.

As for connecting the two houses, I'm assuming the master bedroom is on the 2nd floor? The cabling from the laneway house will likely be entering the basement of the main house, assuming you run it below the frost line. You could run the cabling up the side of the house to the master bedroom, but that's going to be an eyesore possibly. Otherwise, you'll have to fish it through the walls up to your master bedroom. You could potentially used one of the existing jacks in the house though to patch it in as well.

I guess you don't have any floorplans from the contractor/builder? Something that shows where they wired everything...it would be helpful
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Old November 7, 2011, 10:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Shadowmeph View Post
Off topic question here , what is the difference between CAT6 and CAT5e? I was thinking of running some lines into a few rooms But looking around at web sites I see both, and also what are the female connectors called so I can mount them in the walls?
Cat 6 cable looks similair to cat 5e except it uses a heavier gauge of copper wire, and is also twisted tighter. It can accommodate much more bandwidth than cat 5e and is used in fiber networks for the indoor wiring. Its only a few dollars more per box than cat 5e, and is much more future proof.
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Old November 7, 2011, 01:25 PM
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Cool ty for the info
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Old November 7, 2011, 11:14 PM
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Originally Posted by dandelioneater View Post
Cat 6 cable looks similair to cat 5e except it uses a heavier gauge of copper wire, and is also twisted tighter. It can accommodate much more bandwidth than cat 5e and is used in fiber networks for the indoor wiring. Its only a few dollars more per box than cat 5e, and is much more future proof.
Is it worth it to go with Cat 6a over Cat 6?
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Old November 7, 2011, 11:20 PM
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Originally Posted by JD View Post
I think if you get a licensed network installer, rather than having an electrician do it, it'll be done better. I'm sure it'll work either way, it's just if you want quality or not. I think in most cases, electricians will just pull the Ethernet through with the electrical wiring, usually resulting in it getting all tangled up.

I think electrical wiring is typically overhead, but it can be buried as well. Depends on the area I suppose. And if the laneway house is being wired in (electrically) to the main house, or if it's going to have its own meter and thus a direct connection to the power companies main feeds. Something the builder/contractor should know what's right.

And yes, PVC should be fine as long as it's below the frost line. PVC/ABS tubing is used for your main sewer line to the city as well, at least in newer homes. You could also use "outdoor" cabling as well, like this: Outdoor CAT 6 Cable, Outdoor CAT5e Cable, Shielded Outdoor CAT 5e Cable, Direct Bury CAT5e cable, Aerial CAT5e Cable, loose tube cable, Toneable duct, armored fiber optic cables just to be even safer should the PVC conduit crack.

I'm assuming you'll have multiple jacks in the laneway house too which is why I suggested installing a switch/patch panel in there too. It'll also cut down on running multiple cables back to the main house and possibly exceeding distance limits of Ethernet.

As for connecting the two houses, I'm assuming the master bedroom is on the 2nd floor? The cabling from the laneway house will likely be entering the basement of the main house, assuming you run it below the frost line. You could run the cabling up the side of the house to the master bedroom, but that's going to be an eyesore possibly. Otherwise, you'll have to fish it through the walls up to your master bedroom. You could potentially used one of the existing jacks in the house though to patch it in as well.

I guess you don't have any floorplans from the contractor/builder? Something that shows where they wired everything...it would be helpful
Unfortunately the builder requires that they install it as mentioned in the contract for the construction of the house. Is that even normal? This is my first time installing it.

I don't understand how the patch panel come into play here. I don't want to create two separate networks. I want the network inside the laneway house to tie into the main house. I know I'll need a patch panel for the master bedroom as that is where all of the cables terminates.

Yea, the master bedroom is on the second floor or third if you count the basement as the first floor. Since the main house doesn't have conduits installed and that the walls are up already, how are they going to fish it up to the master bedroom? Won't a hole need to be drilled to access it?
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Old November 8, 2011, 06:51 AM
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Note when ordering cable.....get STP not UTP for letter

S = shielded twisted pair , gang runs with others. behind walls in conduit

U = unshielded twisted pair, lone run. usally wall outlet to computer
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Old November 8, 2011, 12:08 PM
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Originally Posted by lsquare View Post
Unfortunately the builder requires that they install it as mentioned in the contract for the construction of the house. Is that even normal? This is my first time installing it.
That seems strange? I don't know though, never dealt with contractors.

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Originally Posted by lsquare View Post
I don't understand how the patch panel come into play here. I don't want to create two separate networks. I want the network inside the laneway house to tie into the main house. I know I'll need a patch panel for the master bedroom as that is where all of the cables terminates.
Well typically speaking, you always have wall-mounted jacks terminate to a patch panel, then you connect the patch panel to a switch. You don't HAVE to, it's just the recommended way. You'll need a switch in the laneway house though regardless. No need to have separate cables running around the laneway house and back to the main house. You should just have 1 "trunk" back to the main house.
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Originally Posted by lsquare View Post
Yea, the master bedroom is on the second floor or third if you count the basement as the first floor. Since the main house doesn't have conduits installed and that the walls are up already, how are they going to fish it up to the master bedroom? Won't a hole need to be drilled to access it?
Yeah, some minor holes in the walls will need to be cut then. Usually though (if they're experienced) the damage should be fairly minimal.
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Old November 8, 2011, 12:44 PM
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Originally Posted by lsquare View Post
Is it worth it to go with Cat 6a over Cat 6?
Im not sure. Never worked with 6a before. I'd reckon its just a step up from regular cat6 though

Cat6- wiki


Oh, and on another note, definitely have an installer who specializes in data wiring run the cables. Regular electricians do quick, cheap work when it comes to low voltage wiring because it is easy money for them. I've even seen them run one cable for 2 jacks. They will run their line to the one jack, then they take two pairs from that cable (two pairs are unused) and splice onto it to supply the second jack.
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Old November 8, 2011, 05:49 PM
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CAT6a supports 10Gbps Ethernet, which has yet to be seen in the consumer arena. I think it typically comes only as STP as well.

If you can afford it, and have it installed right, it could be quite useful in the future.
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Old November 9, 2011, 03:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KaptCrunch View Post
Note when ordering cable.....get STP not UTP for letter

S = shielded twisted pair , gang runs with others. behind walls in conduit

U = unshielded twisted pair, lone run. usally wall outlet to computer
I'm not sure if I understand you, but what's the advantage of STP over UTP?
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