Go Back   Hardware Canucks > SOFTWARE > Networking

    
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old May 1, 2011, 07:29 AM
lastsplash's Avatar
Top Prospect
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Fort Nelson, BC
Posts: 54

My System Specs

Default JPEG's

Is it normal for JPEGs to transfer slower than other file types over a gigabit network?
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old May 1, 2011, 07:43 AM
Hall Of Fame
F@H
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Ottawa, ON
Posts: 1,230

My System Specs

Default

What protocol are you using? (Windows File Share, SAMBA, FTP?)

I haven't noticed anything of the sort, but anyway when I copy pictures around I'm easily limited by hard disk speed on my home server (WD Caviar Green 15EARS) before saturating a gigabite connection. I don't know about specific file formats, but I know that transferring a whole lot of little files is much slower than transferring one big file of the same size, which is why I put my little files in an archive (even a .tar with no compression) before sending them over a network.
__________________
"The computer programmer says they should drive the car around the block and see if the tire fixes itself." [src]
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old May 1, 2011, 07:54 AM
lastsplash's Avatar
Top Prospect
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Fort Nelson, BC
Posts: 54

My System Specs

Default

Transferring from a Win7 machine to WHS.

Win7 machine uses SSD and 2x1TB Blacks in RAID0, WHS has 2x2TB Greens and 2x500GB Blues.

Everything transfers at normal speeds until it gets to photo's, then it transfers at around 10MB/sec.
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old May 1, 2011, 08:29 PM
JD's Avatar
JD JD is offline
Moderator
F@H
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Toronto, ON
Posts: 6,951

My System Specs

Default

I'd say it's because you're transferring a bunch of relatively small files. That involves more seeking, reading and writing by the hard drives to perform. Also if you consider the file system too, much more data needs to be written about each file and where it resides physically on the disk. Compared to large files that is a single continuous data stream which involves much less overhead.

As said above though, if you're backing up files, best to just put them into an archive to make a single large file to send across the network.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes