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  #21 (permalink)  
Old January 29, 2011, 06:10 PM
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Tomato and DD-WRT are firmwares based upon Linux. It works perfectly fine with Windows client PCs though as it's only the router's OS in Linux.

I too run a ASUS RT-N16. 100% rock solid. I run DD-WRT though, haven't tried Tomato.

You can also run some basic apps on the router too using Optware. Optware, the Right Way - DD-WRT Wiki
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Old January 29, 2011, 07:54 PM
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tomato and ddwrt don't run on your computer, they run on the router. After that point, the router doesn't care what hardware or OS is going though it.
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Old January 30, 2011, 01:42 AM
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If your not overly comfortable/familiar with Routers I would strongly advise going with Linksys/cisco--will give you the options you need and is relatively easy to find & execute whatever Portforwarding/QOS you might need to.

So easy in fact I have walked friends (who know nothing of networking) through opening NAT/Port Forwarding for their 360 over the phone on their Linksys/Cisco.

Just get a Gaming Rated Router and expect to pay $100 + on it unless you find a nice sale.

Last edited by The Quicken; January 30, 2011 at 01:43 AM. Reason: b/c I don't believe in proof reading
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Old January 30, 2011, 01:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingnubian View Post
I also went through purchasing a new router recently to replace my still functioning Linksys WRT54GL running Tomato Firmware.

Couple observations:

Any router, even if it has the best hardware base, is at the mercy of it's firmware. I have yet to find a router who's default firmware can match 3rd paty offerings such as DD-WRT, Tomato, ect. If a router is not compatible with either of these 3rd party firmwares I will NOT look at it.

That being said, it will now come down the the hardware specs, build quality & warranty service.

I chose the Asus RT-N16 as my router and am extremely happy with it. I run a variant of the original Tomato firmware called "Tomato USB" and with a usb drive plugged into it I have access to network storage, in addition to the home server I also have, if needed.
I would not have purchased this router if I had been stuck using the default firmware. Being DD-WRT & Tomato compatible in addition to over the top hardware specs which include 32MB Flash memory, 128Mb Ram, a Broadcom Processor clocked at 480Mhz, dual USB ports & gigabit lan ports made the decision pretty easy.

This unit really & actually only shines when 3rd party firmware is used with the factory firmware holding back the units performance. The only negative I've seen is that the RT-N16 isn't dual band capable but with all the other pluses I'm very happy with it.
CNET Review

The good: The Asus RT-N16 multifunction wireless router has impressive specs including Gigabit Ethernet and two USB ports. It performs well and works great with third-party, open-source firmware.
The bad: The Asus RT-N16 is bulky and doesn't support dual-band communication. Its USB ports don't provide enough power for bus-powered portable hard drives. When running Asus' stock firmware, the router is buggy and has an unstable wireless signal.
The bottom line: The Asus RT-N16 is a great, fun router for networking enthusiasts who want to use it with third-party, open-source firmware, such as Tomato or DD-WRT. However, everyone else should wait until Asus provides a more stable version of the firmware.
Review: Like motherboards, the hardware Asus is known for making, you can use many different third-party router operating systems (aka firmware) on the RT-N16. Equipped with an overclockable 480Mhz CPU and 128MB of RAM, the router performed great in our trials when it was running DD-WRT, one of the most well-known Linux-based open-source router firmware options.
When using Asus' stock firmware, the RT-N16 was buggy and didn't pass our wireless signal stress test; however, it had decent throughput performance.

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Asus RT-N16 Review - Routers - CNET Reviews
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Old January 30, 2011, 02:04 AM
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If you don't already have a router it sounds like the one to get.....
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Old February 1, 2011, 05:41 PM
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Great, now I'm stuck between the linksys and the asus since I've never actually flashed the firmware on anything before I'm sort of afraid to...Should I just get the linksys for it's ease of use? Both can run dd-wrt as well if I ever decide on switching...
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Old February 1, 2011, 05:50 PM
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There are step by step guides for flashing the firmware and undoing any mistakes.

I have the RT-N16, the firmware is HORRIBLE. I always thought the reviews were over exaggerated, but the stock firmware is honestly unusable, the firmware updates basically trade two bugs for three new ones. The latest 1.9 is semi-usable, it has some DHCP issues that cause connection loss on a regular basis, but it's bearable for my purposes. I just wanted to use the proprietary features.

However, I wouldn't recommend the router TBH. Unless of course you really want to get into DD-WRT/Tomato and have 80 bucks to mess around with.
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Old February 1, 2011, 08:05 PM
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The ASUS flash process is rather painless. You basically flash a small DD-WRT build via the stock ASUS firmware, reset it, then flash the full DD-WRT build. As long as you can read instructions, I don't foresee any problems.

Asus RT-N16 - DD-WRT Wiki
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Old February 2, 2011, 08:59 AM
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currently i am running a wrt54gl with the latest version of tomato. Works great. Flashing a linksys is quite easy at least on the gl version it was. Personally i prefer tomato i find stuff is buried on dd-wrt. But that will be moot as i am going to be going to pfsense soon enough.
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Old February 2, 2011, 12:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lcdguy View Post
currently i am running a wrt54gl with the latest version of tomato. Works great. Flashing a linksys is quite easy at least on the gl version it was. Personally i prefer tomato i find stuff is buried on dd-wrt. But that will be moot as i am going to be going to pfsense soon enough.
I love my 54GL with tomato, rock solid, the thing never goes down and can handle torrents/usenet fine.
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