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-   -   Static IP's from ISP and Wireless Setup - Help (http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/networking/35771-static-ips-isp-wireless-setup-help.html)

GameOnTurtle August 31, 2010 06:29 PM

Static IP's from ISP and Wireless Setup - Help
 
Guess I'll try and be very simple, so as to avoid any confusion.

1. I work at a computer where several computers are connected via Static IP's provided by our ISP (Shaw)
(Example.
IP : 192.168.0.159
Subnet Mask : 255.255.255.0
Gateway : 192.168.0.1
DNS : 192.168.0.1)
I'm no networking guru, but as long as the IP's last few digits are changed between a certain range, it works. Any changes to any other number will cause that computer to not connect to the internet.

2. We don't currently use a router.
Shaw Cable Modem > Old P4 Computer > Ethernet Switch (not sure if 2. matters in my question)

3. We're trying to add wireless to the setup.



Now my first question is...
1. Can I use a router in this configuration out of the switch? If so, how do I enable it (general idea) to accept and relay internet connections? (I'm confused as how to do this, due to the internet we receive being Static IP's.)
Or do I need to put the router ahead of the switch? (Ahead of the computer relaying the signal as well?)


I'd greatly appreciate any help regarding this issue.

Thanks!

MAK August 31, 2010 08:34 PM

I'm not sure what the old P4 computer is doing in there in the middle: Is it a gateway? Simply acting as a bridge?

Long time ago I had an old Pentium III acting as a gateway between the outside world and my internal network. But replacing it with a small router made lots of sense (especially in reducing complexity and saving on the cost of electricity).

So if the P4 is just acting as a router, did you ever think of replacing the old P4 with a router? A router with both wired and wireless ports would connect to the SHAW modem at one end (the WAN connection) and allow you to use both wired and wireless ports at the other end (the LAN end).

The above may be technical in nature and if you are not into networking could be an issue. Simpler solutions:

1. Replace the switch with a router that has wired and wireless ports. The router does not have to actually work as a router: on most of them you can disable Upnp and DHCP server on the router, change the LAN IP address to one of your static addresses and use it as a switch and wireless access point. Do not plug in anything into the WAN (Internet) port of the router. You continue to use the static IP numbers 192.168.0.xxx with all wired and wireless network connections, and all you have to do is setup the wireless (and security).

2. Plug in the router to the switch, and do the same thing as step 1 above.

3. This is more technically challenging, but the advantage is that you won't need to give every device a separate static IP address: you could make the router use one of those static IP addresses (192.168.0.xxxx), and have all wired and wireless computers connecting to the router get an IP address from the router in a different subnet (like 192.168.2.xxxx - you set this up by setting the router's address and enabling the DHCP server):

-Plug in the router (using the "Internet" port) to the switch, then change the settings on the router:
-Set the WAN connection type to "Static IP", and give it one of those IP numbers 192.168.0.xxx, add DNS and mask etc..
-Set the LAN (network settings) of the router to 192.168.2.1, subnet mask 255.255.255.0.
-Enable DHCP.
-Enable and setup your wireless settings and wireless security.

Hope this helps, and good luck with it...

JD August 31, 2010 09:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MAK (Post 423097)
So if the P4 is just acting as a router, did you ever think of replacing the old P4 with a router? A router with both wired and wireless ports would connect to the SHAW modem at one end (the WAN connection) and allow you to use both wired and wireless ports at the other end (the LAN end).

That's all that should be done in this case IMO. Unless there's an absolute reason/purpose of this P4 system, I'd say take it out. If you use the P4 for browsing, then just plug it into one of the LAN ports on the new Wireless Router.

You should have the modem plugged into the router's WAN/Internet port (it'll be labeled) then all your computers that need Internet access plugged into the LAN ports (typically 4 of them). If you need more ports, then plug your switch into one of the LAN ports.

And just so that you are aware, those are not static IPs by any means. They're private addresses. Typically a static IP refers to your external, public IP being constant, which it is not unless you pay extra for it. That 192.168.0.x number is just what your modem's DHCP server dishes out. Basically your modem has some router capabilities.

sswilson August 31, 2010 09:53 PM

Can't say for sure, but I suspect with that kind of setup, the P4 is probably acting as a firewall of some form.

Synth September 1, 2010 06:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sswilson (Post 423151)
Can't say for sure, but I suspect with that kind of setup, the P4 is probably acting as a firewall of some form.

Honestly, even if the PIV was on firewall duties, the OP doesn't look like he can manage it (no offense).

I have to agree with the option of getting a wireless router. It would greatly reduce the complexity of the setup, and might prove easier to configure.

Sagath September 1, 2010 08:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Synth (Post 423201)
Honestly, even if the PIV was on firewall duties, the OP doesn't look like he can manage it (no offense).

I have to agree with the option of getting a wireless router. It would greatly reduce the complexity of the setup, and might prove easier to configure.

And good quality wireless routers can come with a good firewall anyways.

GameOnTurtle September 1, 2010 12:02 PM

Alright, I guess I'll pop in a router and remove the P4.

We were originally using a router there, but it failed to accept a connection after a certain point so we just hooked up any computer with 2 ethernet ports.

Just a quick question,
Is there any configuration needed if I swap the P4 with a router? (due to the nature of static IP)
When I connect a computer to the wireless, will I need to configure the same TCP/IP settings as regular wired computers or is there a way to set a certain DHCP range in a router to automatically configure for those settings?

Thanks guys

SugarJ September 1, 2010 12:11 PM

You can set a static IP on the router, and most routers will allow you to define a range of IP addresses they will hand out to DHCP requests from local systems. Some will automatically assign the same IP to the same MAC address every time.

Edit: You can also still use static internal IP addresses on the office computers. They just have to be configured properly.

GameOnTurtle September 1, 2010 01:01 PM

Ah,

I guess I'll go and try that. Probably tinker around with the settings for a while.

In any case, is DD-WRT on a WRT54GL good in this situation? (About 20 computers always connected, no torrenting but casual downloading at most.)
We mostly want a reliable unit that will crash as less often as possible given the number of computers, and I have a DD-WRT'd WRT54GL at home that I can hook up and test in this case. I've used this at home for about 2 years, rarely ever had a single crash but that was off of 3 computers max. (Usually just 1 or 2)

Another question regarding the WRT54GL, is tomato or DD-WRT better for a 20 computer wired set up with multiple switches? (Ignore the wifi for now)

JD September 1, 2010 06:10 PM

Stock firmware will be fine even. DD-WRT will work just as well. I'd go with something a bit newer than the WRT54GL though, but that's just me.


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