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Old April 6, 2010, 12:41 AM
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Default Permissions on networked machines

We have a simple network with only 2 computers (Vista 32bit Home Premium). We want to share some folders on one of the machines with only one user on another of the machines. At the moment I have the relevant data in the Public folders but this can be changed if need be.

However when I try to add permissions to the folder, I can only apply permissions to the users on the machine the folder is on, not to the users on the other machine. The Location field in the permission dialog box only shows the machine that the folder is on.

Essentially what we have is
Machine1: Users - Wife and 5yo son
Machine2: Users - Me and 5yo son (same son)

Machine 1 has some shared documents in the public folder. I have been able to restrict access to the Public folder from my son's account on Machine 1. But from his account on Machine 2 he can access Machine 1 and then the folders in question.

He's just discovered the joys of clicking everything and we are afraid he might damage or delete some files by mistake.

How can I apply permissions to an individual user on a networked machine other than the one the folder is on?

Thanks!
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Old April 6, 2010, 07:02 AM
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Its pretty simple

First off, remove the files from the public folders, if it's public... everyone can access them (everyone on your network that is)

A little explanation: Since you do not have a domain controller, you cannot use one account for your whole domain (think of it as a given network) So you have the same account name on both computers. Example below

Computer 1: Ricky (that's your son) -> the files you want to share are on this computer
Computer 2: Ricky

Go to computer 1, check the permissions on that folder and remove Ricky. When Ricky sits on PC2 to get access to PC1, he can still login on the network but he cannot access the shared folder. Remember, to connect to PC1 he is using the account on PC1, not PC2. Does that make any sense?

Let me know if you need further clarification
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Old April 7, 2010, 02:29 AM
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Thanks heaps for that. I might not get a chance to look at it again for a day or so, but I will let you know how it goes. Sounds pretty straightforward.

Interesting that I have been able to block access to the Public Folder for "Ricky" while he is on the machine in question, but that is ignored when he is on machine 2.

I'll respond again shortly.
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Old April 8, 2010, 02:06 AM
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That worked perfectly. Thanks a lot!

I tried doing this when we first got the Vista machines and couldn't work out what was going on, so that's how we ended up with the files in the Public folders. I never realised we needed accounts on both machines.

Out of curiosity is it possible/worthwhile setting up a domain controller?
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Old April 8, 2010, 05:29 AM
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Glad it worked out for you :)

I wouldn't recommend setting up a domain controller in your household, I mean you could but is not that simple for beginners. But if you want to know some more, I can tell you that it's the best way to setup a network anywhere, so much more organized, centralized, secure, etc... list goes on.

You can look into it if you'd like, it becomes handy when you have several computers on the same network. You would need a Windows Server OS, install some roles and AD (Active Directory) I'll dig a bit see if I can find you a nice guide for you to setup. If I'm not happy with what I find, I'll post one myself.
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Old April 8, 2010, 06:22 PM
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I'd be curious if you would indeed have a recommended guide for it.
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Old April 9, 2010, 05:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LarkStarr View Post
I'd be curious if you would indeed have a recommended guide for it.
You're probably not going to find a simple guide for setting up a windows domain. Sure, I mean, I could tell you to just run "dcpromo" on a Windows Server machine, but the problem is, without the knowledge to administer said domain, you're going to run into problems.

You'll have to learn the basics of DNS, DHCP, IP subnetting, NTP, Kerberos, then Active Directory itself (meaning LDAP, global catalogs, AD group types, group policy). Those are only the basics, but for a home domain, they'll do.

If you're thinking about systems administration as a career, then by all means go ahead. When something breaks (and with Windows domains, something always does), you'll get useful experience out of the troubleshooting phase. If you're just doing this as a hobby, I advise against it. Running a domain for just 2 or 3 workstations is like setting up a 30 story scaffolding to build a dog house. It'll just get in the way.
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