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The NVIDIA TITAN Z Performance Review

Author: SKYMTL
Date: July 7, 2014
Product Name: GeForce GTX TITAN Z
Part Number: TITAN Z
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Clock Speed Stability & Thermal Imaging


One of the areas we had to delve into was how the TITAN Z handled itself when faced with continual high workloads. Several other hot-running air cooled cards like AMDís R9 290X tend to downclock after 10 minutes or less of gaming and this card is a prime candidate for the same thing. Remember, AMD needed a water cooler to bring their R9 295X2 within their required specifications while NVIDIA has taken a more traditional approach of optimizing TDP to achieve their goals.


Our temperature results show the TITAN Z hitting a maximum of 83įC after which it levels out without any more upwards movement as fan speeds increase to properly limit additional heat buildup. While the R9 295X2 was able to achieve much lower temperatures, we canít forget that it does use an all in one water cooling setup which adds complexity and quite a few more points of failure (however remote they may be). This is pretty impressive considering the not-so-insignificant TDP of two GK110 cores.


In order to get thermals properly managed, there are a few frequency gymnastics going on behind the scenes but nothing that would adversely affect performance. When overhead allowed, the TITAN Z offered short sprints to an incredible 1005MHz while normalized clocks evened out between 980MHz and 993MHz. Both are quite a bit higher than NVIDIAís stated Boost speed of 876MHz. Weíre sure there will be instances when this card will offer lower clocks when TDP-limited situations arise but throughout testing the card didnít exhibit any adverse behavior that would have noticeably impacted performance.


With stable temperatures and frequencies framerates remained extremely constant throughout the benchmarking runs. Even after an hour or more, we didnít see any large variances.

All of these results point towards a well-balanced card that can easily level its various aspects and hit a given performance bracket. As you will see in the next few pages, the TITAN Z is capable of some incredible feats but it has been rolled into a package which costs an absolute fortune.



There is however one caveat here. While the TITAN Z is able to cool off the cores quite well, all the heat they produce has to go somewhere and in this case it mostly gets dumped directly into your enclosureís interior. In addition, the backplate gets ludicrously hot so youíll need plenty of airflow to keep things in check. This means managing thermals of other components in form factor builds will be exceedingly difficult with a TITAN Z installed.
 
 
 

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