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NVIDIA GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB Review

Author: SKYMTL
Date: March 24, 2013
Product Name: GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB
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Temperature Analysis


For all temperature testing, the cards were placed on an open test bench with a single 120mm 1200RPM fan placed ~8” away from the heatsink. The ambient temperature was kept at a constant 22°C (+/- 0.5°C). If the ambient temperatures rose above 23°C at any time throughout the test, all benchmarking was stopped..

For Idle tests, we let the system idle at the Windows 7 desktop for 15 minutes and recorded the peak temperature.



The Boost’s reference heatsink isn’t all that efficient in dispersing heat from the core but temperatures remain at manageable levels. Expect board partners to take up some of the slack here with custom coolers and even some upgraded stock heatsink designs.


Acoustical Testing


What you see below are the baseline idle dB(A) results attained for a relatively quiet open-case system (specs are in the Methodology section) sans GPU along with the attained results for each individual card in idle and load scenarios. The meter we use has been calibrated and is placed at seated ear-level exactly 12” away from the GPU’s fan. For the load scenarios, a loop of Unigine Valley is used in order to generate a constant load on the GPU(s) over the course of 15 minutes.


As with most modern cards, the GTX 650 Ti Boost is relatively quiet in its reference form.


System Power Consumption


For this test we hooked up our power supply to a UPM power meter that will log the power consumption of the whole system twice every second. In order to stress the GPU as much as possible we used 15 minutes of Unigine Valley running on a loop while letting the card sit at a stable Windows desktop for 15 minutes to determine the peak idle power consumption.

Please note that after extensive testing, we have found that simply plugging in a power meter to a wall outlet or UPS will NOT give you accurate power consumption numbers due to slight changes in the input voltage. Thus we use a Tripp-Lite 1800W line conditioner between the 120V outlet and the power meter.


While the Boost uses a Gk106 core with a single SM disabled and high clock speeds, its power consumption numbers were actually quite surprising. Both it and the GTX 660 are rated for a TDP of about 140W and yet NVIDIA’s newest card consumes significantly less. This could be due to anything from a lower leakage core to the disabled SM having a cumulative impact upon efficiency.
 
 
 

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