NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660 Ti Review

Author: SKYMTL
Date: August 14, 2012
Product Name: GTX 660 Ti 2GB
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A Closer Look at the GeForce GTX 660 Ti 2GB

Due to the similarity of the cores used in the GTX 670 and GTX 660 Ti, many of NVIDIA’s board partners will be interchanging one reference design with the other. In this case, we used EVGA’s Superclocked model as a starting point since it uses a standard layout with a few small differences such as slightly rounded edges on the heatsink shroud. Even with these minor changes, it still retains the reference length of 9 ˝” and sets the template that other entry-level models will follow.

Even though the GTX 660 Ti’s TDP level is just 150W and it draws about 134W under typical load scenarios, NVIDIA has equipped it with a pair of 6-pin power connectors in order to provide adequate power overhead for overclocking. With a recommended power supply rating of 450W, this card should be an easy drop-in upgrade for the vast majority of systems out there.

As with the more expensive cards in NVIDIA’s current Kepler-based lineup, the GTX 660 Ti houses a pair of SLI connectors which allow up to three cards to run in tandem.

Much like its predecessors, the GTX 660 Ti uses a standard Kepler backplate configuration though EVGA has chosen to modify it somewhat with larger exhaust openings for increased airflow. A pair of DVI connectors and single full sized outputs for DisplayPort and HDMI are included, making it compatible with 3+1 NVIDIA Surround setups.

Flipping the card over reveals a sight that should be familiar for anyone who has read our GTX 670 review. For the sake of cost savings and production simplicity, reference GTX 660 Ti cards will use the same PCB –with a few slight modifications- as NVIDIA’s GTX 670.

While the heatsink shroud continues out to this card’s full length, the actual PCB is much, much shorter. We should note however that many board partners will be eschewing this short PCB design and will instead be using their own, slightly longer versions. Now is also a great time to mention that we’ve already seen some preliminary designs of single slot GTX 660 Ti cards so stay tuned for our reviews of those in the coming months.

With the differences between EVGA’s version and a reference design in mind, there really isn’t much to distinguish the GTX 660Ti from its big brother. However, the underside of this card’s PCB does have a single noticeable change: the memory IC placement has been rationalized for the GTX 660 Ti’s trio of controllers.

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