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EVGA GeForce GTX 465 1GB Superclocked Review

Author: Michael "SKYMTL" Hoenig
Date: May 31, 2010
Product Name: EVGA GeForce GTX 465 1GB Superclocked
 
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For all intents and purposes, the months following NVIDIA’s release of the GTX 400 series have been interesting to say the least. At first, retail channels were starved of both the GTX 470 and GTX 480 due to either popularity or supply issues (we’ll probably never know which it was) but the situation today is vastly improved with both cards being available at most retailers. Pricing hasn’t changed much either with both NVIDIA and ATI sticking to their guns by continuing on the same course as before. This is actually extremely interesting since many expected a price drop was in the cards for ATI’s HD 5870 and HD 5850 once the competition launched their products but from where we are standing, even without reducing prices, their cards are still extremely popular. All that was left was for NVIDIA to flesh out the rest of their Fermi-based lineup.

Today’s release of the GTX 465 is actually a huge step in the right direction for NVIDIA because they finally have a DX11 part that can compete in the highly popular sub-$300 market. We mentioned in the past that ATI is extremely competitive in the high-end $300+ category and in nearly every one of the sub-$200 price points. However the decidedly lackluster $240 HD 5830 is the only card that effectively bridges the veritable chasm between $200 and $300. Granted, some lower-end HD 5850 cards have been known to retail for slightly less than $300 when on sale but for the most part, NVIDIA had a $100 window to work with. With a suggested price of around $279, it seems like the GTX 465 is trying to thread the needle head’s worth of space between the HD 5830 and the HD 5850.

Interestingly enough, NVIDIA isn’t “officially” launching this card themselves but has instead decided to let their board partners take point and design their own versions of the GTX 465 around a basic set of specifications. This recipe worked with varying degrees of success for ATI and their partners on the HD 5830 launch but we have to remember that things can go awry if an AIB decides to “go cheap” on components. For the most part however, the GTX 465s we have seen all seem to be using reference GTX 470 PCBs. In our opinion this will add to the cost of what should be a value-oriented product but at least the platform itself is known to be more than durable enough. We’ll get into the specs a bit further in the next section.

We know that many of you are scratching your heads over the name of this card since NVIDIA usually reserves the “xx5” moniker for any updated cards that may be launched after the first series has run its course. In this case they have decided to skip the obvious GTX 460 name which does seem to imply there is some other card waiting in the wings. We’ll let the usual conspiracy theorists chew on that one for a little while longer though.

In this particular review we will be looking at the EVGA GTX 465 1GB Superclocked Edition which not only packs increased clock speeds but also comes with EVGA’s lifetime warranty and 90-day Step Up program. As you read this, you should be able to find this card in stock at retailers for between $15 to $20 more than a reference GTX 465.

For the time being, the GTX 465 should whet the appetites of NVIDIA’s faithful who couldn’t stomach paying $350 for a GTX 470. Whether or not it will satisfy this craving and successfully trounce not one but two ATI products is exactly what we are about to find out.

 
 
 

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