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-   -   How many switches needed for a long cable run. (http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/guides-how-tos/53370-how-many-switches-needed-long-cable-run.html)

GKatascosa April 15, 2012 03:07 AM

How many switches needed for a long cable run.
 
I just want to make sure I'm armed with a little more info about a long network cable run. I'm having Wimax installed, and unfortunately it's going to require a 700 ft cable ran. The installer said that one switch will be needed to be installed 200 feet away from the antenna and I should be fine. I'm thinking that one switch won't be enough for such a long cable run. Maybe one @ 200 foot from the antenna and another when it reaches my house. Am I close? BTW..this is cat 6 cable. any input is appreciated.

BlueByte April 15, 2012 06:21 AM

100 meters is the limit of Ethernet. You will want to run prob a bit less then that, so tech you should have 2 switches in the run. Make sure the installer is using outdoor Cat cable and something like teck 90 power and bellow at least 6" of dirt. I worked with a wireless ISP a few years ago that had bought up another wireless company in the area. They found out the difference of doing it right and doing it the wrong way(the company they bought).

Long runs like that create enough heat that woodland animal like to cuddle up to them and munch on the cable. putting it underground will help with this as well as tree falls and other things that could damage it. Even look at throwing it into some cheap PVC water pipe to further protect it. and most importantly it might be worth talking to a few electricians to make sure what the installer is doing is right before he does it. Because when its done wrong I have seen scorch marks where things have been nicked and in a dry summer that could be bad.

It might also be cheaper and less painful to do a solar panel, battery bank and a 2nd wireless shot to your house. Ubiquiti Networks, Inc. makes some solid gear to shoot to your house. this type of setup is more controllable, your house will be unaffected by lightning strikes if you are having a tower put up, and mother nature will have less wire to cause havoc with.

bissa April 15, 2012 11:22 AM

why does it need to be 700 feet away?
EDIT: the wireless solution suggested in the post above mine would most likely work. I was going to suggest something similar if having the base station you are installing at 700 feet was an absolute necessity.

BlueByte April 15, 2012 12:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bissa (Post 620921)
why does it need to be 700 feet away?
EDIT: the wireless solution suggested in the post above mine would most likely work. I was going to suggest something similar if having the base station you are installing at 700 feet was an absolute necessity.

Hills usually

JD April 15, 2012 02:43 PM

Not sure what the cost difference would be, but why not consider running fibre instead? Granted you won't need such bandwidth, but at least it'll eliminate the distance and interference issues.

supaflyx3 April 15, 2012 02:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JD (Post 620965)
Not sure what the cost difference would be, but why not consider running fibre instead? Granted you won't need such bandwidth, but at least it'll eliminate the distance and interference issues.

Because 700ft of fibre would cost 10s of thousands of dollars to lay and get it running. Although you could start up your own ISP. :biggrin:

Shadowmeph April 15, 2012 03:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by supaflyx3 (Post 620967)
Because 700ft of fibre would cost 10s of thousands of dollars to lay and get it running. Although you could start up your own ISP. :biggrin:

I wished that I could do that hehe

Soullessone21 April 15, 2012 03:36 PM

At my work they used a solution where it converted 2 wires to Ethernet and the run was 800' well 750' but the devices connected on either side of the line and converted it to 10/100 internet on either side and works flawlessly I can look up the company that sold us the devices if you would like

Soullessone21 April 15, 2012 03:41 PM

it only has the limited range of 5,200' feet just not enough to be practical :rofl:
Blitstorm Technology and away you go, think we paid $299.99 for the full kit with the 2 devices :)

JD April 15, 2012 06:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by supaflyx3 (Post 620967)
Because 700ft of fibre would cost 10s of thousands of dollars to lay and get it running. Although you could start up your own ISP. :biggrin:

Really? I didn't think the actual fibre optic cable compared to CAT6 was THAT much more. I know the terminating equipment will be more costly though.

I just shudder at the idea of a 700ft run of copper cabling. If you must stick to it, definitely go with a solution designed to repeat Ethernet signals cleanly. Just throwing some switches in probably isn't the best idea, though technically it should work. It's just that switches don't really do anything to "restore" data so you'll likely end up with a fair bit of packet loss, especially if it's stormy outside.


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