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jcmaz July 15, 2009 09:18 PM

Removing Parts from Your COmputer
 
Can anyone explain to me the procedures and precautions on removing parts from your computer? Say computer rebuild??? Plz spread your knowledge w/ the noobs. :)

Any help will be appreciated!!!

THX

Perineum July 15, 2009 11:15 PM

Turn off PSU at the back but leave it plugged in. From that point on, the PSU grounds the entire case and no problems with static. Just make sure that anytime you approach the computer you stand still, then touch the metal of the case - don't scuff your feet around.

mo' power July 16, 2009 03:38 AM

I find it is best to turn off the psu. I then remove the power cord from the psu. Finally, I hit the power button to drain any residual electricity from the capacitors. I have seen in cases that even with the power supply disconnected from the power source, I sometimes get a little flicker from the motherboard led.

gingerbee July 16, 2009 04:32 AM

leave the power supply plug in electricity takes the easiest root folks so by leaving the power supply plugged in it's grounded.

PLg July 16, 2009 06:13 AM

Grounding yourself is really important like they explained above. Go on youtube. You'll find tons of video of people building computer or changing parts. That way, you'll realize that there's really nothing that hard about building a comp.

Perineum July 16, 2009 11:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mo' power (Post 224320)
I find it is best to turn off the psu. I then remove the power cord from the psu. Finally, I hit the power button to drain any residual electricity from the capacitors. I have seen in cases that even with the power supply disconnected from the power source, I sometimes get a little flicker from the motherboard led.

That's all fine, as long as you put the power cord back into the PSU immediately after doing what you described....

frontier204 July 16, 2009 01:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gingerbee (Post 224329)
leave the power supply plug in electricity takes the easiest root folks so by leaving the power supply plugged in it's grounded.

+1; If you unplug your computer completely and place it on something not grounded (e.g. carpet) then you've almost defeated the purpose of "grounding" yourself to the PSU or case.
I'd leave the power plug in as much as possible. If the PSU is of a pesky type that doesn't have an on/off switch, you can disconnect the 20-24 pin header so nothing in the computer remains powered (IIRC the PSU only gives its full 12V and 5V if the computer is "on" or was jumpstarted). Or you can use my other crazy method and connect the ungrounded computer to something that is grounded using some wire.

bojangles July 16, 2009 03:47 PM

It's not the fact of being grounded guys, it's the fact of being at the same potential as your computer parts. Current only flows if there's a difference in potential between two objects, so having either the PSU plugged in or not doesn't make a difference. All you have to do is touch your case because all your parts are at SOME potential already. You want to be at the same potential as the parts!

1) Turn off the PSU, and leave it in. Press the power button on your computer to discharge the capacitors. Take it out (this is entirely up to you. I just disconnect everything).
2) Touch a metal part of the case, and unscrew all necessary case sides to make sure you can get rid of any wires in the way.
3) Touch the heatsink/case whatever just to double check, then begin taking out the easy parts like video card, sound card, NIC. Remember to disconnect the power cables from each device beforehand.
4) I tend to leave hard drives and optical drives last, depending on orientation and available space.
5) If you have room, you won't have to worry about removing the heatsink to take out the motherboard, otherwise remove it and then take out the mother board.
6) REMEMBER TO KEEP TOUCHING THE CASE SHOULD YOU FEEL UNCOMFORTABLE TOUCHING YOUR ELECTRONICS. Simple as that.

You can work on carpet too, just don't move too much. I do it and nothing has fried YET. I just TOUCH THE CASE whenever I add/remove a device.

artistpavel July 16, 2009 09:03 PM

Does touching work on a painted case, cause they all painted inside out, only screws are bare metal.

rjbarker July 16, 2009 09:17 PM

I'm exactly the same as Bojangles....carpet n all!!!


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