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-   -   Desoldering a part from a motherboard (http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/guides-how-tos/14733-desoldering-part-motherboard.html)

cdn_Madrach February 10, 2009 06:43 AM

Desoldering a part from a motherboard
 
Well the power jack from wife's laptop is dead so I purchased a new one. I don't have a lot of experience soldering so any tips would be welcome. At the moment I'm practicing on an old dead mobo. I have managed to solder pretty decent but am lacking i the desoldering department. I have read that desoldering braid used with flux will work. Any experienced solderer's?

bushwhacker February 10, 2009 07:17 AM

specific tool for this
 
Vacuum Desoldering Tool - RadioShack.com

3 of 7 February 10, 2009 07:59 AM

I was able to get the power jack off of my daughter's dell laptop without issue using solder braid with a little flux on it, it worked pretty good... It worked best for me by heating the braid lots before pressing it to the part.
I hope it works out for ya :thumb:

MpG February 10, 2009 03:33 PM

Personally, I find that vacuum desoldering pumps can be a little flakey, and their recoil isn't always welcome around more delicate circuits. For braid, I find it's best to put the braid between the iron and the target, and let the copper conduct the heat directly into the solder that you're trying to melt. The desoldering that I've done hasn't required any flux, tbh. When you're putting a new component on, on the other hand...

3 of 7 February 10, 2009 03:37 PM

I put the flux on the braid.. To tell you the truth I didn't try it without it.

mklym February 10, 2009 06:23 PM

If your soldering tip/iron is clean and properly tinned, then all the flux you need is on the tip already. Clean and re-tin often. Properly tinned, you should need no more than a second or two to absorb the old solder. Excessive heat can ruin a multi-layer PCB, like a motherboard. Same as when you go to solder in the new jack. With a properly cleaned and tinned tip, put the tip on the point where the PCB and the jack lead meet, then apply solder to the tip, moving to the lead in one motion. One or two seconds and you should be done one connection. Do the same for the rest. And use small diameter, flux core electronics solder (yes, it makes a difference).

Good luck. :)

BrainEater February 10, 2009 06:40 PM

+1 for desoldering braid and flux.If you don't have braid , you can use some stranded 14Ga wire too......

Those desoldering vacuum jobbies only work on 1940's PCB's.....big wires in big holes. :haha:

gl !

cdn_Madrach February 12, 2009 03:52 PM

re
 
Thanks for the input guys, it's much appreciated:thumb::thumb: Might practice some more this weekend to build my confidence lol.

donimo February 12, 2009 04:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BrainEater (Post 149640)
+1 for desoldering braid and flux.If you don't have braid , you can use some stranded 14Ga wire too......

Those desoldering vacuum jobbies only work on 1940's PCB's.....big wires in big holes. :haha:

gl !

they work ok, I find yo gotta trim the tips a bit so you can jam them right in there is all.

course I now have a $2000 solder/desolder station at work now so.... :punk:

Dr_BenD_over February 12, 2009 04:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BrainEater (Post 149640)

Those desoldering vacuum jobbies only work on 1940's PCB's.....big wires in big holes. :haha:

gl !

Which is pretty much what a power jack on a laptop is. :bleh:

I actually prefer this to the crappy RS pump, although I still stick with my trusty Soldapult at work for big stuff, braid is better for fine work and SMT. Make sure you get(have) a decent wattage iron, modern systems have some pretty substantial power planes that require some decent wattage to work with.


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