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Old July 21, 2008, 11:09 PM
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Default Please Help, First time Swapping a CPU/Mobo into new case!

I did look through the How to's on this site and elsewhere but can't seem to get what I am after.
Well call me a noob, But this is the First time I will be Changing a mobo and CPU into a new case.
I just purchased a used Server off my Friend and I will be doing a mix and match to get my ASUS P5B with a XEON 3070 into my new (Server) case. Not to forget Four 750Gb Hard Drives.
I believe that the new? PSU a Sparkle 550W is better than my Cooler Master 600W so I will be leaving that component alone.
Is there someone who has a spare monet to help guide me through this process so I don't turn two working Computers into a big pile of Broken Parts,LOL
The most I have done to my Sig rig is change out the GPU and Ram a few different times.
So I will need a complete how to remove a CPU, Clean and ready it for the Transplant into it's new home.
A complete how to remove a MOBO and install a different one.
Thanx for any and all help. I am eager to fire up my new CPU and see how far I can CRANK it up
Pictures or links would be great people.
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Old July 22, 2008, 12:33 AM
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No pictures, I'm afraid, but this is the general procedure that I would use myself. The exact order may change slightly, depending on the case layout. Some cases won't let you remove the PSU until the motherboard is out of the way, vice versa for others. Some plugs aren't reachable until the component they power is actually taken out. But this is the general guideline that I use.

1. Back-up all important data first!

2. Prepare. Make sure you've got some space to work with. Grab any tools that you need (screwdrivers, etc) beforehand. Get a small bowl/container to put loose screws/connecters in. A foam mat or some old anti-static packaging makes a nice place to set the electrical components on (the motherboard especially), but a washcloth works too. Arrange things so that you can stand/sit in one location for the entire process, which prevents any possible chance of building up a static charge from walking. A piece of paper and pencil can be used to take notes on where certain things were hooked up.

3. Unplug the powersupply and turn it off. Throughout this entire process, get in the habit of touching the case/PSU before handling any component, to prevent static discharge. Better safe than sorry, right? Unhook any external cables (video, sound, network, etc).

4. Remove the CPU heatsink. It doesn't have to be done first, but it usually frees up lots of room to work with. If you really want to, and it's not blocking anything else, you could probably leave it attached. But it's usually more of a pain to do it that way.

5. Disconnect all reachable power plugs from their components. Motherboard and GPU plugs, fan connectors, that sort of thing. If you can reach them easily, pull the power plugs form the hard disks.

6. Remove all header cables (USB, IEEE1394, case speaker, etc) from motherboard.

7. Disconnect the HDD/optical drive data cables (and their power connectors if you haven't already). If your harddrives were in any sort of RAID setup, take note of which hard drive was connected to which motherboard header. I can't verify this and have never cared to actually test otherwise, but I wouldn't count on the RAID controller to be able to tell that you've sudden connected portions of an array to different ports. Better safe than sorry. Remove the hard drives and optical drives from the case. Any other case devices (card readers) can also be removed at this time.

8. Remove all the expansion cards (GPU, sound, network, etc), taking note of which slots they were in. (If your case has a removeable motherboard tray, this can be done after sliding it out of the case in the next step)

9. Unscrew the motherboard from the case. If the case has a removable motherboard tray, feel free to slide it out of case first. If the PSU interferes with this (rare), it can be removed first. Otherwise, remove the PSU afterwards. Remove the motherboard connector plate from the old case (you'll be reusing it).

10. At any point throughout these steps, the case fans can be removed if they get in the way, or if you intend to move them over to the new case. Once there's nothing left in the old case, it can be set aside, and the new case can be brought in.

***************************

1. Install the PSU into the new case first. Install the motherboard faceplate from the old case into the new case. Again, while reinstalling, touch the case/PSU each time before handling any components. Better safe than sorry.

2. If they're not already there, install the motherboard stand-offs into the new case, so that they match up with the motherboard's holes - in both position and number. Make sure that there aren't any extra standoffs present in the case. Server cases especially, can have weird layouts for these, so double-check. Try to use the standoffs that came with the new case if possible, since the threading for standoffs isn't universal.

3. Match up the motherboard to the standoffs, and verify that each motherboard hole has a standoff below it. If you can't see a standoff below the hole, fix it before going any further. A standoff pressing against the motherboard anywhere except those holes will cause serious problems. If the heatsink uses a backing plate, make it's aligned properly with the heatsink holes. Once this is all satisfactory, screw down the motherboard.

4. Reinstall the CPU heatsink.

5. Reinstall the expansion slot devices, making sure each one seats fully into the slot that it was in before. If the new case has a removeable motherboard tray, slide the tray into the case at this point.

6. Reinstall the hard drives, hooking up the power cables and matching the data cables to their original ports. Ditto for any optical drives.

7. Reconnect the main power cables to the motherboard and accessories. Depending on the case, do what you can to route them out of the way of everything else.

8. Attach the case power/reset/lights/speaker/whatever headers to their appropriate pins on the motherboard.

9. Plug in any other necessary power cables, including all fan plugs.

10. Reattach all external cords/cables, including the monitor and PSU's cords.

11. Double-check for any parts lying around that don't seem to have been re-installed. Any screws/connectors that came out of the old case, they'd better have a good reason for not going into the new case.

11. See if the computer turns on. Since the motherboard was completely unhooked, the BIOS will probably know it and want you to verify settings before going further, but your settings should be saved just fine.

********************

That's the general order I use, at any rate. I'm sure others will have suggestions/improvements of their own.

If you've got some oddball layout, adapt as necessary. But in a nutshell, when I take the system apart, my goal is to A) disconnect each system component from power/data as soon as it's convenient, and B) remove the components starting with the easiest. When reinstalling, my goal is to A) reinstall each component as soon as it won't interfere with anything else, and B) reconnect them to data/power as soon as their cables won't block anything else.
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Old July 22, 2008, 11:11 AM
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great guide, Thanx for taking the time to do that for me. I am just very nervous about the whole process. I have no clue how much pressure to apply to anything to get things done or undone.
No idea how to remove the old thermal paste from Heatsink, Or how much thermal paste to apply to heatsink.
Sorry asking such noobish question, I just want this to go smooth. I have two working computers right now, And if I do this wrong. I could end up with a big pile of broken computer parts, LOL!!
Wish there was a 'How To' video of building a computer from scratch.
But thanx for your quick guide:)
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Old July 22, 2008, 11:32 AM
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Building a PC for the first time is like having sex for the first time. You are nervous at first but it gets easier and better the more you do it. ;)
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Old July 22, 2008, 11:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eldonko View Post
Building a PC for the first time is like having sex for the first time. You are nervous at first but it gets easier and better the more you do it. ;)
LOL true. and you'll do anything for it... haha
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Old July 22, 2008, 11:48 AM
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Well, here is one that you may not have heard yet. On the backplate, there are a bunch of holes that wont line up. Beside those, there are others that might. To make sure they do, a really decent ATX plate might have arrows that point at them and state that they are ATX:xD
And also, DO NOT bolt the backplane on to the backplate to HARD, or you will split the board.
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Old July 22, 2008, 01:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bushwickbill View Post
great guide, Thanx for taking the time to do that for me. I am just very nervous about the whole process. I have no clue how much pressure to apply to anything to get things done or undone.
No idea how to remove the old thermal paste from Heatsink, Or how much thermal paste to apply to heatsink.
Sorry asking such noobish question, I just want this to go smooth. I have two working computers right now, And if I do this wrong. I could end up with a big pile of broken computer parts, LOL!!
Wish there was a 'How To' video of building a computer from scratch.
But thanx for your quick guide:)
One difficulty is to install the board inside the case, and making sure that all i/o connectors (video, keyboard, mouse, SATA, etc) are through thir respective holes: the easiest way is to come in the case with the board at an angle. This also clear the standoffs that are on the case backplate - those could damage the board's back surface.

Once the connectors are in their respective holes, it's just a matter of aligning the standoffs to the board screw holes - they should match, since you already made sure that they are at their correct locations...

Old paste can be removed using 95% alcohol (drugstore or even Walmart has that); adding paste? That depends which HSF you have.
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Old July 22, 2008, 01:45 PM
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Just try and keep your hands from shaking...that was always an issue for me. Especially when applying thermal compound.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Eldonko View Post
Building a PC for the first time is like having sex for the first time. You are nervous at first but it gets easier and better the more you do it. ;)
Haha greatest analogy ever.
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Old July 22, 2008, 02:21 PM
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As well as above.

If you do bump/scrape the the board on the standoffs (which must be in right places) try not to worry about it and just adjust the board gently-dont panic.

As long as you handle the board carefully around the edges and avoid touching delicate components it will be fine. Be sure to put the power SW and reset SW in the right areas too otherwise no boot.

The scary part for me is pressing the power switch.

Oh and dont use the apogee GT backplate if you intend to move it to another board.
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Old July 22, 2008, 02:36 PM
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I have to admit I was scared when I first biult my system. it actually kept me up at night wondering if I was going to screw it all up!!! Now im on to water cooling and god only knows whats after that!!! Its a blast getting your fingers inside there and tinkering around!!!!

just take your time, breath.... shut the TV off, and remember that how ever delicate the parts might look... they can be very durable!!!!
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