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-   -   Z77 boards and "Intel" Raid? (http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/cpus-motherboards/54996-z77-boards-intel-raid.html)

Nevakonaza June 23, 2012 10:36 AM

Z77 boards and "Intel" Raid?
 
Hey guys,

Was just wondering,Ive noticed alot of the Z77 chipset boards support Raid,But a lot of them in the description do not mention if its "Intel" raid or those crappy alternative controlers.

Is all Z77 boards have Intel Raid?

This is the board im looking at.

MSI Z77A-G43 S1155

OR

Gigabyte Z77-DS3H

Would the raid on that board be good for 2x vertex 2 60gb SSDs in Raid 0?

NyteOwl June 23, 2012 05:41 PM

It is the same basic type of RAID that Intel introduced with it's Intel Matrix Storage and now calls Rapid Storage Technology. It relies on software drivers for full functionality. You will not find a true "hardware" RAID controller on a consumer grade desktop motherboard. RAID 0 is a misnomer as there is no redundancy and actually increases the risk of data loss.

Stosh June 24, 2012 06:22 AM

since many of the ssd's are already tapping out the bandwidth of sata III, I don't think doing a raid 0 would bring any benefit.

Phill June 24, 2012 06:50 AM

Quote:

Would the raid on that board be good for 2x vertex 2 60gb SSDs in Raid 0?
yes. I have run ssd raid 0 for some time over the past few years and I liked it a lot. there one caveat though. Until Intel RST 11.5 is released you will not have Trim support for your array. There is some good news though, it may not be that long till 11.5 comes out!

Phill June 24, 2012 07:00 AM

Quote:

since many of the ssd's are already tapping out the bandwidth of sata III, I don't think doing a raid 0 would bring any benefit.
IMO you are way off the mark there. He is using Vertex 2 drives. There will be a large improvement for him. As well I would say that even if he was using M4's or a pair of Chronos Deluxe or Max IOPS drives there would still be an improvement by going to raid 0. Each drive may come close to saturating its own channel under unique circumstances (atto,as ssd etc testing is not real world) but that does not mean that raid 0 will show no benefits over a singe drive!!

dandelioneater June 25, 2012 03:03 PM

I think the only benefit to running raid 0 with smaller capacity ssd's would be the better bang for the buck. Usually a 120GB capacity drive will cost more than 2 60GB drives combined. I can tell you that you really won't notice much of an increase in performance with raid 0 over non-raid in real world usage (sure, benchmarks will show almost a doubling in read and writes but you yourself won't really "feel" like there has been much of an increase). The near instantaneous access time won't get any faster either. I don't think that giving up TRIM is worth it for 2 ssd raid 0 as the raid volume's performance will degrade overtime without TRIM. You need 4 ssd's and a dedicated raid card for it to be worth it IMO.

Stosh June 25, 2012 05:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Phill (Post 637110)
IMO you are way off the mark there. He is using Vertex 2 drives. There will be a large improvement for him. As well I would say that even if he was using M4's or a pair of Chronos Deluxe or Max IOPS drives there would still be an improvement by going to raid 0. Each drive may come close to saturating its own channel under unique circumstances (atto,as ssd etc testing is not real world) but that does not mean that raid 0 will show no benefits over a singe drive!!

well lets go over a couple of details. let me know if I error somewhere...

ok, raid 0 serves one purpose and only one purpose. faster speeds, right?

ok.

the maximum bandwidth of sata 3 is 600MB/s, which is theoretical only, since there's always some overhead.

ssd's are already in the mid to upper 500MB/s range.

so you put a pair of them, into a channel of data that maxes out at a theoretical 600MB/s... where exactly is the improvement going to come from?

I mean if it does somehow, then great. But I just don't see it.

wirerogue June 25, 2012 05:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stosh (Post 637408)
well lets go over a couple of details. let me know if I error somewhere...

ok, raid 0 serves one purpose and only one purpose. faster speeds, right?

ok.

the maximum bandwidth of sata 3 is 600MB/s, which is theoretical only, since there's always some overhead.

ssd's are already in the mid to upper 500MB/s range.

so you put a pair of them, into a channel of data that maxes out at a theoretical 600MB/s... where exactly is the improvement going to come from?

I mean if it does somehow, then great. But I just don't see it.

2 drives and 2 sata 3 channels. you can double your numbers.

this is coming from my 4 month old, no trim, almost full raid set. not nearly what it used to be but, not too shabby either.

http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-...09251563_n.jpg

Generic User #2 June 27, 2012 12:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stosh (Post 637408)
well lets go over a couple of details. let me know if I error somewhere...

ok, raid 0 serves one purpose and only one purpose. faster speeds, right?

ok.

the maximum bandwidth of sata 3 is 600MB/s, which is theoretical only, since there's always some overhead.

ssd's are already in the mid to upper 500MB/s range.

so you put a pair of them, into a channel of data that maxes out at a theoretical 600MB/s... where exactly is the improvement going to come from?

I mean if it does somehow, then great. But I just don't see it.

its not a drive with two controllers inside....its two drives with their own controller on their own SATA port.


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