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Old May 7, 2012, 06:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terrybear View Post
Here's the problem most of you's seem to not ask/identify ..... IS this user going to be running only 1 task PERIOD at a time on there system? Then MAYBE the arguments about using 4 cores or less is valid .....

BUT here's the reality of things .... you plan to game online? &/also voicechat/skype? look at multiple web pages ... lisen to music in the background, run 1 or more im programs as well? IF you do those things or would like to in a multi tasker kinda way .... then you need to look at more then 4 core/thread solutions .... ESPECIALY if you want max preformance in a game or what not.

Try frapsing a game your playing while playing it on a 4 core solution .... your gonna get a preformance hit from it cause the game + the fraps is tryin to share 4 core's in say a 2500k cpu senario. It wont happen.
+1
-I run so much crap in the background with g13,g15,x9 core temps, msi-ab, Mcafee, forte sc, mutli gpu,s
-ran 4 cores for years off and on [8 for bc2] ,bf3 comes in -bios change now to 8 threads = stable playing while 10.000 post of stutter fest on 2500k's,it's good for the buck but does not compare to a 2600k or 3770 k today.
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Old May 7, 2012, 07:00 PM
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For gaming only 4 cores is the way to go today for bang for buck. An i5 whether 2400/2500k/3550/3570k etc all fit the bill. Bottoms line is it seems that sandy bridge processors OC better than the newer ivy bridge processors (and only K cpu can OC). That all said if you plan to run at stock settings a 2400 or any 35xx cpu will be great. If you want to OC then a 2500k is the way to go.

I7 CPU have the benefit of hyperthreading that can really help out in heavily threaded applications. For the majority of people including gamers the extra approx $100 for an i7 sees next to no improvements in gaming...so you should invest that $100 into other components like the GPU. If you have the extra money laying around or use programs that can take advantage of the extra threads, then the i7 could be the way to go.

Really what the 2500k represents the bottom right of the exponential curvy that is performance vs dollar right before you start paying a substantial amount of extra money per % improvement in performance.
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Old May 11, 2012, 11:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Bond007 View Post
For gaming only 4 cores is the way to go today for bang for buck. An i5 whether 2400/2500k/3550/3570k etc all fit the bill. Bottoms line is it seems that sandy bridge processors OC better than the newer ivy bridge processors (and only K cpu can OC). That all said if you plan to run at stock settings a 2400 or any 35xx cpu will be great. If you want to OC then a 2500k is the way to go.

I7 CPU have the benefit of hyperthreading that can really help out in heavily threaded applications. For the majority of people including gamers the extra approx $100 for an i7 sees next to no improvements in gaming...so you should invest that $100 into other components like the GPU. If you have the extra money laying around or use programs that can take advantage of the extra threads, then the i7 could be the way to go.

Really what the 2500k represents the bottom right of the exponential curvy that is performance vs dollar right before you start paying a substantial amount of extra money per % improvement in performance.
Good post, thanks.

I'm just about to pull the plug on an order, and I needed this perspective.

Now all I need is to decide on a motherboard. Apparently the Intel brand Z77 boards have overclocking capabilities, and the prices look decent enough.
My current build is a Gigabyte socket 775 board with a 9650 quad core that i've had great success with, so Gigabyte remains a possibility as well.
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