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Old November 10, 2006, 10:50 PM
Misoprostol
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Default Kentsfield Sub-Zero OVERCLOCKING and Geforce 8800 GTX Benches!

Hey everyone. I just got my chiller hooked up to our ES Kentsfield chip. I haven't begun doing any stress testing or overclocking yet, but I'm posting this from a quad core rig running at a chilly -21C.

I also just installed an eVGA Geforce 8800 GTX video card in this rig, and I'll be doing some serious overclocking on that as well. Unfortunately I do not have the means to hook the chiller up to the video card at this point in time, but the numbers will blow you away anyhow I'm sure.

Here's a couple of teaser pictures. Stay tuned



Test rig

Intel Core 2 Extreme X6700 @ 3.745GHz
2GB Mushkin @ DDR2-680 3-3-3-10
Asus P5W DH
eVGA Geforce 8800GTX
OCZ GameXStream 600W
Seagate 7200.10 320GB
Creative X-fi

Custom Water Chiller was used for all benchmark runs.
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Last edited by Misoprostol; November 11, 2006 at 01:15 AM.
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Old November 10, 2006, 11:49 PM
Misoprostol
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Wow. I wish I could change the title of this thread from sub-zero to "ambient".... Under load at 3.66GHz 1.6V, this Kentsfield chip has gone up to 22C. Unbelievable.

It should also be noted that the Asus P5W DH in its current BIOS revision is NOT a very good Kentsfield FSB overclocker. I was not even able to get to 260FSB no matter how many volts I gave the chipset or the CPU. Increasing the CPU multi to 11 and setting the FSB to 266 gave me an instant boot at 3.66GHz when I couldn't even get it to boot at 3.5 at 10x350.
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Old November 11, 2006, 12:36 AM
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If your chip went from -21C idle to +22C load, there's something wrong.

Chiller might be making poor contact with the chip? :confused:

With our Q6600 at 3.8Ghz 1.46V, cooled with a Tuniq 120, we measured core temps between 59-63C load. Admittedly, ambient temps were 20C.


BTW, if you want a good clocking kentsfield mobo go with the P5B-DLX, or wait for the 975XBX2 :D

Last edited by MAC; November 14, 2006 at 10:57 AM.
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Old November 11, 2006, 01:12 AM
Misoprostol
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Hey MAC,

I think there may be something wrong with the chip, but I'm not able to do any lapping or IHS removal tricks on this particular CPU, so I'm going to have to settle for these results. It's also not the best two die CPU block that I'm using with the chiller. It's a Danger Den TDX block, so most of its cooling ability is focused in the middle of the CPU, where there's a gap for a Kentsfield.

I actually had similarly high results with this Kentsfield and an APOGEE. Honestly I don't know what revision our ES is, so that may be an issue as well, but I was getting up into the 72C range as measured by core temp with a quad 120mm fan radiator ambient water cooling loop. I know it's not the water temps because the GPUs (7900GTs in this case) load around 35C.

Any toying with the Kentsfield and ambient water cooling I did was on a Bad Axe 2. The reason I'm using the P5W DH is that I have already condensation-proofed it. I guess I'm willing to settle for the results I've obtained. My goal tonight was front page on the ORB, and I've accomplished that.
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Last edited by Misoprostol; November 11, 2006 at 01:19 AM.
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Old November 13, 2006, 05:36 PM
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I've never found an accurate Core 2 temperature utility with the new SSTBUS running temperature sensor readings to the ICH Might want to try a 965 board some time, preferablly one that hasn't had the south bridge monkeyed with as that should allow a proper connection between the SSTBUS and the ICH. Even with the TDP at 130W you shouldn't be seeing a 40 deg swing in temperatures. The Kentsfield should be a fairly mature ES sample since early samples went out months ago.
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Old November 13, 2006, 10:30 PM
Misoprostol
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I should clarify that we didn't just get this engineering sample. What's possible is that the "Arctic Silver Ceramique" that Danger Den includes with the water blocks is not really Ceramique at all. If it's an inferior compound, then what I've been using is gelling at sub-zero temperatures. This is very possible, and I didn't have anything else handy at the time.
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Old November 27, 2006, 11:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Misoprostol View Post
I should clarify that we didn't just get this engineering sample. What's possible is that the "Arctic Silver Ceramique" that Danger Den includes with the water blocks is not really Ceramique at all. If it's an inferior compound, then what I've been using is gelling at sub-zero temperatures. This is very possible, and I didn't have anything else handy at the time.
I'm not a big fan of the Ceramique. I found it extremely had to spread and it took a long time to break itself in and make good contact.
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Old December 2, 2006, 01:23 PM
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Default zoikes!

By the look of those pictures, perhaps this forum isn't the place for greenhorns such as myself...
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Old December 3, 2006, 11:35 PM
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Please don't get that impression. Hardware canucks is a place for everyone to learn, and if it weren't for on-line forums, I never would have learned as much as I have. It takes time (and money) to become experienced in these things, but that's not for everybody. There are many out there who are far more advanced than me. Here's how I'd say it ranks (approximately) in levels:

lvl 1 - hardware noob, wouldn't know a CPU socket from a RAM DIMM
lvl 2 - fairly familiar with hardware, can assemble a computer, not up to date on recent changes
lvl 3 - can choose well rounded, current components that make sense with each other, besides being compatible
lvl 4 - familiar with basic overclocking concepts, and wanting to dabble in it
lvl 5 - intermediate overclocking, generally using air cooling. Pretty easy to get this point with some help
lvl 6 - loves tweaking, spends almost as much time measuring the performance of their machine as actually USING it. Uses air or water cooling.
lvl 7 - Starts to get kinda crazy around here. Experimenting with packaged phase change kits, building chillers. Peltier cooling falls into here somewhere
lvl 8 - learning to build your own phase units, very familiar with sub-zero cooling
lvl 9 - dry ice and liquid nitrogen. 'nuff said
lvl 10 - can actually fabricate pretty much anything required for any of the before levels. These guys are usually engineers of some sort by trade.
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Old December 19, 2006, 04:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Misoprostol View Post
Please don't get that impression. Hardware canucks is a place for everyone to learn, and if it weren't for on-line forums, I never would have learned as much as I have. It takes time (and money) to become experienced in these things, but that's not for everybody. There are many out there who are far more advanced than me. Here's how I'd say it ranks (approximately) in levels:

lvl 1 - hardware noob, wouldn't know a CPU socket from a RAM DIMM
lvl 2 - fairly familiar with hardware, can assemble a computer, not up to date on recent changes
lvl 3 - can choose well rounded, current components that make sense with each other, besides being compatible
lvl 4 - familiar with basic overclocking concepts, and wanting to dabble in it
lvl 5 - intermediate overclocking, generally using air cooling. Pretty easy to get this point with some help
lvl 6 - loves tweaking, spends almost as much time measuring the performance of their machine as actually USING it. Uses air or water cooling.
lvl 7 - Starts to get kinda crazy around here. Experimenting with packaged phase change kits, building chillers. Peltier cooling falls into here somewhere
lvl 8 - learning to build your own phase units, very familiar with sub-zero cooling
lvl 9 - dry ice and liquid nitrogen. 'nuff said
lvl 10 - can actually fabricate pretty much anything required for any of the before levels. These guys are usually engineers of some sort by trade.
Wow level-6, if I had more money well...................
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