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-   -   Fan Stacking? (http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/air-cooling/18894-fan-stacking.html)

MrFoxx June 14, 2009 10:16 AM

Fan Stacking?
 
I have a question, i have a few extra 120mm fans, and iwant to know if it would be a good idea to stack them, meaning they are both going the same direction but right on top of eachother, unobstructed of course.

Im not sure if that would increase, or impede the airflow. I couldnt find any one really discussing this subject, any help appreciated.

lowfat June 14, 2009 10:22 AM

It will add noise and will add zero benefit. Likely actually cause more issues. The only way stacked fans would work if they were exactly the same fan and spun in the opposite direction.

MrFoxx June 14, 2009 10:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lowfat (Post 208900)
It will add noise and will add zero benefit. Likely actually cause more issues. The only way stacked fans would work if they were exactly the same fan and spun in the opposite direction.


Hmm how can i achieve that?

MpG June 14, 2009 11:23 AM

You can't, really, unless you find two fans that happen to spin opposite directions, but the vast majority of fans spin clockwise-towards. Generally speaking, if you want to see benefits with stacking fans, you need something in the middle (i.e. heatsink, radiator, etc) to diffuse the airflow between sets of spinning blades. An example of opposite directions would be something like THIS.

MrFoxx June 14, 2009 11:25 AM

I dont know much about radiators, what is that. And i plan on stacking through my case,i have a cm690, i plan on using the rubber things and attaching one fan in the case, then the case then a fan on top.

like

120mm fan---------------
case ============
120mm fan ---------------

Or do i need more of a spacing?

lowfat June 14, 2009 01:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MrFoxx (Post 208921)
I dont know much about radiators, what is that. And i plan on stacking through my case,i have a cm690, i plan on using the rubber things and attaching one fan in the case, then the case then a fan on top.

like

120mm fan---------------
case ============
120mm fan ---------------

Or do i need more of a spacing?

don't bother. He meant like having a fan on one side of a radiator/heatsink than have one on the other side. One is pushing air, the other is pulling air. Having them directly over top each other isn't a good idea.

Realityshift June 14, 2009 01:47 PM

A better idea to limit noise and possibly increase cooling is to gut the spare fans and use them as spacers, works best on CPU heatsinks but it may also lower the sound on the normal case fans as well. Basically you gut all the blades and what not out of the spare fan and use it as a spacer between whatever you are cooling, this allows for 0 cooling loss from the active fan where as if a fan is just normally placed a percentage of the cooling performance is lost due to the various blockages caused by the fan struts and mounting.

MrFoxx June 14, 2009 01:51 PM

So, how would that work, a fan, a hallow fan, then another fan?

lowfat June 14, 2009 02:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MrFoxx (Post 208976)
So, how would that work, a fan, a hallow fan, then another fan?

no it would only benefit on a heatsink/radiator.


fan -> fan with the fan blades and motor ripped out -> heatsink -> fan with the fan blades and motor ripped out -> fan

Joekerh June 14, 2009 03:18 PM

Noctua.at - sound-optimised premium components "Designed in Austria"!
This cooler by Noctua demonstrates the most common application of two fans. Fan, heatsink, fan.

Noctua fans are also a good example of a high static pressure fan. I would recommend them or others like them for situations where there is a lot of obstruction.

When it comes to case fans, one quality fan is enough for each in/out. I would save the old fans for use if others fail.


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