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Old December 14, 2012, 05:15 AM
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Perineum Perineum is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andonios View Post
Hi Guys,
This might be an old thread but I came here looking because I am almost in the same situation with my current 16gb RAM and I do video editing and was wondering if another 16gb would help me or not since I might be changing my ram soon.

BUT, while reading all these posts I wanted to add some infor that I've learned online reading about the subject in detail the last few days.
First, it isn't advised to just ever add more memory to ANY existing memory chips even if they are same brand and speed. The reason is, all memory added should be matched to run well together at the manufacturers and be bought in kits.
So if you need 32 gb total, you should ONLY install a 32gb kit, (4)8gb sticks that is sold together and has already been tested to run sucessfully together. For many years I didn't understand this fact, and was always confused when I read about people saying such stuff. BUT it is a fact, especially if you want to avoid sudden BSOD issues when doing highly complicated editing or rendering. RAM might seem to run fine until certain cells get accessed and look out, trouble. People usually blame software and drivers when this starts happening too.

So if you have 16gb installed and want to upgrade to 32gb (because your board is able) even if you have available slots, what you NEED to do is remove your existing ram and replace it with a kit of 32gb ram that is tuned and matched to run well together.
You read online So many people write how they bought 16gb in 2 sticks so they can easily upgrade later on to 32 with 2 more sticks, that's a NO NO...
Remember buy as much ram as you will need when building your system because adding more later will be like starting ALL over again, no matter how many empty slots you have.
Especially with fast, high performance RAM modules used for graphics work and fast rendering projects.
Well, I'm sure some purists would agree with you, but I've "added on" to RAM dozens of times without issue. However, some motherboards are more picky with 4 slots full rather than 2 slots full. I always match the RAM up with whatever is currently in it, and run the paired sticks in the appropriate slot for dual channel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andonios View Post
My current situation is more complicated. I built a system using 16gb DDR3 CL9 1600 ram but my sticks are rated at 1.65v, and I have them running no problem with a 1155 cpu Sandybridge 2nd gen processor which the more I research apparently is another No No, I didn't know about when I built my system.
From what I've learned even though my ASUS P8Z68 board will allow it, you shouldn't run ANY memory more than 1.5v with a 2nd gen Sandybridge CPU because INTEL says it will void their warranty and it is pushing the onboard memory controller to the limit and it will shorten the CPU's lifespan.
I didn't know that when I purchased my ram, and others say it isn't proven, but i really don't want to chance burning up my CPU so I've underclocked my current RAM to 1333mhz and lowered the voltage to 1.5v and it seems to be running ok now but when I start rendering and animating, I want to get the MOST out of my system.
So now I need to decide to either leave my ram underclocked (and hope it's ok running with lower than recommended voltage) so I don't burn up the onboard memory controller on my SandyBridge i7 2600K CPU and leave that 16gb installed OR replace it with memory that runs at 1600mhz with only 1.5volts?
At the same time, since I am replacing ALL my ram, I am now wondering if I too should upgrade to 32gb purchased all together in a tuned kit. Decisions, decisions!!!
Any advice would help, Thanks!
I've heard of people running 1.65 RAM without issue, but I think it's a much better idea to run 1.5v instead. However, if what you have is working, and you didn't plan on upgrading then just leave it alone.
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