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Old October 9, 2009, 06:14 PM
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vulcan500rider vulcan500rider is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Regina, SK
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Default DIY Speakers - The Sealed TriTrix Set

Hi All!

I thought it was time to start a build log up. I've been working for a little while on a DIY project which I hope will result in a nice set of speakers for my home theater system, which is currently a reasonably unimpressive Sony HTIB.

My budget was pretty limited for this project, so upgrading the receiver was out, and an entire speaker redo was probably not going to happen. After some discussion, particularly with Biff on HWC, I decided that the thing to do would be to buy the TriTrix Recession Destroyer Kit from PartsExpress, and build the enclosures myself. That way, there was no need for me to design or tweak a crossover--which I had NO clue how to do.


I began, fittingly, with materials and tools. I bought myself my first table saw (pulled from a much more easily justified to my wife "tool budget"), borrowed a router from a buddy, and bought a 4x8 sheet of MDF.


The first big hurdle was a way to cut ROUND holes in the MDF. I had considered buying the circle jig from PartsExpress, but couldn't justify a $56 jig set--I hoped I could find a local one for cheaper. Unfortunately, I couldn't. SO, I decided that I pretty much understood the principle, and I would make one.

Grabbing a trusty spare piece of acrylic that was originally a lid to a small container, I marked out mounting spots for the router base, and then determined where each circle's centers would be in relation to the router bit, once each for the inner and outer circles.


The first hole caused some cussing, as I for some reason decided to try and "easy" cut first and cut out the inner circle first--which means the middle falls out and you no longer have a central pivot point...WHOOPS. Some cardboard and quick thinking later, I managed to wedge the circle back in again and do the outer circle.


With that done, the rest of the cuts were fairly easy, though for anyone attempting the same kind of project, I would suggest cutting the front baffle and the back plate in one go, so that they're exactly the same width. Same deal for the tops and bottoms, and the sides. I put the enclosures together with nothing but clamps and wood glue, and they're probably solid enough to use as step stools.



On the electronic side of things, I got all of the parts together, and I have constructed the first of the two crossovers from the components provided with the RD kit. After testing with an MP3 player and an old mixer board I had lying around, it seems to be working fine.




Still waiting to be done is the filling, sanding, priming and painting of the baffles, and all but the painting on the rest of the cabinets, as I will be covering them with adhesive vinyl. I also need to assemble the other crossover, mount them in the cabinets, and put the holes in for the binding posts.

Back to work...
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